white-tailed deer


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Related to white-tailed deer: black-tailed deer

white-tailed deer

called also Odocoileus virginianus (syn. Dama virginianus). A small, 3 ft high at the withers, graceful red to gray true deer with a distinctive white tail.
References in periodicals archive ?
The DNR will work with researchers from Mississippi State University on this project as it has on the multi-year predator-prey study of the effects of winter and predators on white-tailed deer in the U.
SNWR, perhaps like other National Wildlife Refuges, has experienced issues related to high deer densities and deer herbivory including, complaints from nearby farmers about agricultural damage from white-tailed deer, high doe; buck ratios, low fawn weights, and extensive damage to forests.
There's a huge population of white-tailed deer in central Texas, and they're always setting off the cameras.
wtd]-challenged pen-mates, as has been shown for CWD-affected white-tailed deer (6,8,9).
The ramifications of white-tailed deer herbivory have not necessarily been limited to forests.
A peculiar sample of malaria-parasite DNA turned up in a mosquito that had bitten a white-tailed deer (a conclusion gleaned from other DNA in blood the mosquito had fed on).
In most southeastern USA ecosystems, this results in use of white-tailed deer, rodents, rabbits and seasonally available soft mast.
These free-ranging exotics, in particular Axis deer (Axis axis Erxleben 1777), compete with native white-tailed deer because of overlap in habitat use and food selection (Butts et al.
The giant liver fluke, Fascioloides magna, is a trematode parasite that infects the livers of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), elk (Cervus canadensis), and caribou (Rangifer tarandus) across North America (Fig.
Distribution and movements of white-tailed deer in southern New Brunswick in relation to environmental factors.
North American white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) population sizes have dramatically changed during the last 100 years (Randall and Walters 2011).
Deer ticks have always been around, albeit in fewer numbers due to the lack of adequate habitat and smaller population of white-tailed deer (critical hosts for female deer tick reproduction).