Peromyscus leucopus

(redirected from white-footed mouse)
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Related to white-footed mouse: deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, Deer mice
A wild mouse that is a carrier of deer ticks, which spread Lyme disease, and a reservoir for hantavirus, the Four Corners disease agent

Peromyscus leucopus

deermouse; called also white-footed mouse.
References in periodicals archive ?
We evaluated temporal variation in white-footed mouse population dynamics by scheduling trapping sessions to occur during the four primary stages of crop growth (i.
At the same time, the white-footed mouse has been moving farther north as winters get milder - at a rate of around 11 kilometers a year, the researchers estimate.
Because they are primarily woodland forms, the short-tailed shrew and white-footed mouse were taken in relatively low numbers at Goose Pond.
Gibbes L and Barrett GW: Diet resource partitioning between the golden mouse (Ochrotomys nuttalli) and the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus).
An adult hispid cotton rat weighs about 110g while an adult white-footed mouse weighs approximately 22g.
Molecular Linkage of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome to the White-footed Mouse, Peromyscus leucopus; Genetic Characterization of the M genome of New York Virus.
It appears that, with shorter winters favoring the white-footed mouse, P.
Nevertheless, the pattern of white-footed mouse colonization and their spatial distribution once they became established on the site may be the clearest example we have of the impact of habitat fragmentation on small mammal successional dynamics in our system.
Ostfeld also notes that white-footed mouse population explosions affect other species.
The deer (or bear) tick, which normally feeds on the white-footed mouse, the white-tailed deer, other mammals, and birds, is responsible for transmitting Lyme disease bacteria to humans in the northeastern and north-central United States.
Larvae usually seek the white-footed mouse or other small animals as hosts.
The white-footed mouse turns out to be the real culprit, for it carries the Lyme disease bacterium.