whistleblower

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whistleblower

((h)wis′ĕl-blō″ĕr)
One who reports illegal, improper, unethical, or unprofessional behavior to authorities. The person divulging the information is usually an employee of the institution where the alleged activities occurred. Protection afforded to whistleblowers varies, depending on the nature of the misconduct that is alleged and the jurisdiction of the place where the event occurred.
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A careful study of the textbook at Page 6, Paragraph 3 would convince any reader that when the Federal Government announced and advertised the whistle-blower policy, it made an offer to the whole world in contemplation of a unilateral contract.
1,2) Given their role in precipitating the launch of several major public inquiries, whistle-blowers are increasingly described as positively contributing to service improvement through bringing to light the problems of healthcare quality and safety that too often remain hidden from public exposure.
CREDIBILITY If you are a Garda whistle-blower, the very first thing they try to do is to undermine your credibility.
However if the whistle-blower's direct evidence is critical to the disciplinary hearing then the organisation needs to consider what undertaking to provide anonymity it can give, if any, to a whistle-blower in such circumstances.
He stressed that establishing a whistle-blowing system entails a strong commitment from the company board and its executives to ensure confidentiality of information relayed by the whistle-blowers, thus protecting their anonymity.
Normally, an employee must raise their concern internally to be protected as a whistle-blower - this gives an employer the opportunity to identify if there is any substance to the complaint and, if so, try and reduce any related risk by taking remedial action, which may avoid or limit any bad publicity.
A lengthy whistle-blower history exists in this country, from Daniel Ellsberg, whose release of the Pentagon Papers in 1971 sparked retaliation that eventually lead to Watergate--to Joe Carson, the eight-time prevailing whistle-blower at DOE--to Dr.
Second, be supportive of active, involved audit committees, increased focus on internal controls, a strong code of ethics and support for whistle-blower hot lines.
Whistle-blower retaliation claims have become increasingly popular, in part because of the post-Enron shift in the public's perception of whistle-blowers, who are now perceived as heroes taking on unscrupulous corporations.
Publicly held companies are now required to have a venue in place to receive the reports of anonymous whistle-blowers.
Wales on Sunday revealed earlier this year that part of the Public Audit (Wales) bill aimed to gag whistle-blowers who fight a David v Goliath battle to reveal malpractice and corruption in their councils.
In the wake of the Enron and WorldCom scandals, additional protections for whistle-blowers under California law were expected.