wet

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wet

Military
A term used in spy circles referring to any spilling of blood. An assassination may be termed a wet affair, wet job, wet operation or, generically as wetwork or wet work.

Sexology
Referring to vaginal moistness, as in arousal.

Vox populi
Untried, inexperienced, green

wet

(wet)
1. Soaked with moisture, usually water.
2. A colloquial term for edematous or overhydrated.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Wetter, it will be incumbent on forward-thinking physicians to take the lead.
h "Ir pl m 139 Years since Ireland had a wetter winter than one we just endured
Their results surprised them: Only one model, developed by the Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research in the England, reproduced the rainfall patterns they found from the geological evidence: a pattern of strong, widespread dry conditions over Indonesia, Southeast Asia and northern Australia, wetter conditions in eastern Africa, saltier waters (less rainfall) in the eastern Indian Ocean and Bay of Bengal and less salty waters (more rainfall) in the Arabian Sea and the western Pacific.
Wetter, who is also clinical professor emeritus at the University of Miami.
The report said crops that need irrigation, such as sugar beet and vegetables, may be forced to shift from the drier east of England to the wetter west of the country.
a little over a year ago, Community Trust Credit Union Vice President of Finance/Accounting Jerry Wetter said he's been living the best of both worlds.
Wetter than the Mississippi: Prohibition in Saint Louis and Beyond is a close study of America's Prohibition era, with particular focus on the greater St.
He added: "This pattern is consistent with predictions that our winters are set to become wetter as a result of climate change.
Male students preferred overall wetter kisses than their female fellow students and showed a greater preference for tongue contact and open-mouth kissing.
Analysis of mud from the bed of Lake Malawi in southeast Africa has revealed that Homo sapiens was able to migrate out of Africa because of a shift to wetter weather.
Forty-five million years ago, for example, the Arctic was much warmer and wetter than it is now.