weaning

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weaning

 [wēn´ing]
1. the discontinuing of breastfeeding.
2. the discontinuing of dependency on assisted ventilation.
mechanical ventilatory weaning in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting the patient to breathe without the aid of a mechanical ventilator. See also dysfunctional ventilatory weaning response.

wean·ing

(wēn'ing),
1. Transition of the human infant from breast-feeding or bottle nursing and commencement of nourishment with other food.
2. Gradual withdrawal of a patient from dependency on a life-support system or other form of therapy.
3. Gradual elimination of physical or psychological dependence on a harmful or otherwise inappropriate substance or activity.
4. In veterinary medicine, the process of removal of the offspring from the dam; complete housing separation is often combined with removal of nursing support; or of bottled milk as a source of nutrition in those animals already taken off the dam; both processes are preceded by creep feeding.

wean·ing

(wēn'ing)
1. Permanent deprivation of breast milk and commencement of nourishment with other food.
2. Gradual withdrawal of a patient from dependence on a life-support system or other form of therapy.

weaning

Substitution of solid foods for milk in an infant's diet.

weaning

the accustoming of a young mammal to a form of nutrition other than its mother's milk.

weaning,

n the period of transition from breast feeding to eating solid foods.

wean·ing

(wēn'ing)
1. Transition of the human infant from breast-feeding or bottle nursing and commencement of nourishment with other food.
2. Gradual withdrawal of a patient from dependency on a life-support system or other form of therapy.
3. Gradual elimination of physical or psychological dependence on a harmful or otherwise inappropriate substance or activity.

weaning

the act of separating the young from the dam that it has been sucking, or receiving a milk diet provided by the dam or from artificial sources.

weaning age
the average age at which groups of lambs, calves or piglets are weaned off milk, which may be provided by the dam or by artificial means. In pastured animals the age is that at which the young animals are judged to be able to survive on their own by grazing, say 4 to 6 months. In intensive farming systems where good quality, well-balanced diets can be fed, and the young kept under close surveillance, early weaning is practiced successfully. Also modern farming methods demand early weaning so that the dams are again available for mating. Dairy calves, sucking pigs and some lambs are now weaned at 2 to 7 days after birth. Under natural conditions more normal weaning ages, though still subject to a great deal of variation are: calves—4 to 6 months; lambs, goat kids—8 to 10 weeks; piglets—30 to 60 days; foals—5 to 6 months; puppies—6 to 8 weeks; kittens—7 to 8 weeks.
early weaning
weaning before the young have begun to take significant amounts of alternative diets, e.g. piglets at 3 weeks of age. Usually because of a shortage of feed for the dam, or because of the need to increase the number of young produced per female per year. Segregated early weaning of pigs is a practice to reduce the transmission of disease from sow to offspring. Piglets are removed from the sow at 10 to 14 days of age and subsequently reared in a separate environment. Medicated early weaning of pigs is similar to segregated early weaning except the sow and litter are medicated with an antimicrobial active against a specific bacteria whose transmission from sow to piglet is being targeted.
weaning weight
the weight of the young at weaning. Used as a target for young food animals raised for commercial purposes and is an expression of the size at which the young are capable of leading an independent existence. In calves, in particular, the age is related to the development of adequate rumen function. Adjusted weaning weight in beef cattle is the weight immediately at weaning adjusted to 205 days of age and to mature dam age equivalence.
References in periodicals archive ?
The slope of the regression line in Figure 1 represents the mean change in weaning weight over the weaning ages, and the thick dotted curve signifies mean weaning weight for each weaning age day.
Least squares means along with the standard deviation (SD) and percent coefficient of variation for weaning weight and wool traits under study are given in Table 1.
Litter body weight growth rates and weaning weights were different between treatments (p<0.
Derived variables included weight at 60 days of age, weaning weight, and pre-weaning daily gain.
Estimated breeding values (EBVs) for birth weight, weaning weight and yearling weight for the males ranged from 0.
The evaluated traits were: birth weight, weaning weight adjusted to 205 d and yearling weight adjusted to 365 d.
Birth weight, weaning weight and pre-weaning average daily gains
2009) conducted a study with the intention of predicting weaning weight from several body measurements (height at withers, height at rump, body length, chest girth and depth, middle and hind rump width and chest width), at the weaning period from a total of 101 Karayaka lambs and reported that 73.
The identification number links information about each animal, whether it concerns assigning the calf to DNA-based parentage determinations, weaning weight, feedlot gain or the eventual quality grade of its carcass or size of the rib-eye steak it produced.
sample in the calf weaning weight example from n = 9 to n = 36 animals.
05) in the three nutrient levels, whereas final weaning weight tended to increase (p = 0.