weak

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weak

(wēk) [Old Norse veikr, flexible]
1. Lacking physical strength or vigor; infirm, esp. as compared with what would be the normal or usual for that individual.
2. Dilute, as in a weak solution, or weak tea.
3. Biologically or chemically active; said, e.g., of acids, bases, electrolytes, muscles, or toxins.
References in periodicals archive ?
In those days, the syndication services were the ultimate 90-pound weaklings.
This isn't a fit bloke versus a weakling, this is Hercules versus an infant.
Medical scientists in boiler suits also demand to examine the Nottinghamshire lad after his transformation from Test middle-order weakling to one-day monster hitter.
These primo plants might absorb the losses and still outdo weakling plants.
We have worked hard on his defence because he was a bit of a weakling.
For example, great historian though he was, Allan Nevin's portrait of President James Buchanan in his essay |The Needless Conflict', as a compliant, quivering weakling, putty in the hands of a |Directory' (composed of the Southern members of his Cabinet), is no longer accepted.
Against the background of the Irish Civil War of 1922, the action concerns the attempt of Juno Boyle to overcome the triple menace of war, poverty, and drunkenness which results in the destruction of her family Juno 's heroic posture, which is defined in terms of her unillusioned, long - suffering grasp of reality, is contrasted to that of her husband, the " Paycock, " a vain, posturing -- but extremely funny -- weakling who hides from reality behind a bottle and a flow of fine language.
Olsen plays the titular character whose overbearing aunt Madame Raquin (Jessica Lange) leaves her trapped in a loveless marriage to weakling cousin Camille (Harry Potter star Tom Felton out of his depth in more ways than one).
Now he's painting himself as a dehumanised weakling suffering from no self-confidence, lack of motivation, lethargy, sleeping difficulties and anxiety.
KICKING sand in the face of enfeebled Nick Clegg, the political equivalent of a ninestone weakling, is a sport Labour enjoys.
But an eight stone weakling who did press-ups every day.