wavelength


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

wavelength

 [wāv´length]
the distance between the top of one wave and the identical phase of the succeeding one in the advance of waves of radiant energy.

wave·length (Λ),

(wāv'length),
The distance from one point on a wave (frequently shaped like a sine curve) to the next point in the same phase; that is, from peak to peak or from trough to trough.

wavelength

/wave·length/ (λ) (wāv´length) the distance between the top of one wave and the identical phase of the succeeding one

wavelength

the distance between a given point on one wave cycle and the corresponding point on the next successive wave cycle. A pure color is produced by light of a specific wavelength. Electromagnetic waves of different wavelengths account for many of the transmission characteristics of radio and television.

wave·length

(λ) (wāv'length)
The distance from one point on a wave (frequently shaped like a sine curve) to the next point in the same phase; i.e., from peak to peak or from trough to trough.

wavelength

the distance between two successive points at which the wave has the same phase. For example, visible light has a wavelength of between 400 nm (violet) to 750 nm (red).

wavelength 

Distance in the direction of propagation of a periodic wave between two successive points at the same position in the wave (e.g. the distance between two crests). Symbol: λ. Note 1: The wavelength in a medium is equal to the wavelength in vacuum divided by the refractive index of the medium. Unless otherwise stated, values of wavelength are generally those in air. The refractive index of standard air (15ºC, 101 325 N/m2) lies between 1.00027 and 1.00029 for visible radiations. Note 2: The reciprocal of the wavelength is called the wave number. Note 3: The wavelength is longer for red light than for blue light. Wavelength λ is equal to
λ = c/v
where c is the velocity of light and v is the frequency of light. (Fig. W1) See fluorescence; infrared; interferometer; light; phase; Bezold-Brücke phenomenon; electromagnetic spectrum; ultraviolet; wave theory.
Fig. W1 Wavelength of light in air and in a medium of refractive index n 1 and n 2 , respectively (λ 2 = λ 1 / n 2 )enlarge picture
Fig. W1 Wavelength of light in air and in a medium of refractive index n1 and n2, respectively (λ2 = λ1/n2)

wave·length

(wāv'length)
The distance from one point on a wave (frequently shaped like a sine curve) to the next point in the same phase; i.e., from peak to peak or from trough to trough.

wavelength

the distance between the top of one wave and the identical phase of the succeeding one in the advance of waves of radiant energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Director, The Austrian Film Museum (in preferential order) Videodrome Wavelength Family Viewing Crash Pour la suite du monde La Region centrale The Sweet Hereafter Atlantic City Dying at Grace Mon oncle Antoine
However, metals usually absorb rather than reflect the shorter wavelengths of infrared and visible light that are required for photonic circuits.
Figure 2 shows the wavelength dependence of the relative absorption of fluorescein in a pH 9 solution.
In the area of wavelength calibration, NIST has developed Standard Reference Material (SRM) transfer standards based on rotational-vibrational transitions in acetylene and hydrogen cyanide molecules.
The wavelength of light used cannot be much larger than the desired size of features on the chip.
SRM 2517a, High Resolution Wavelength Calibration Reference for 1510 nm to 1540 nm, can be used to calibrate the wavelength scale and linearity of wavelength measuring equipment.
Because these wavelengths are low-energy emissions, they reveal long-duration, subtle activity in their sources.

Full browser ?