wastewater


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Related to wastewater: Wastewater Treatment

wastewater

(wāst′wat″ĕr)
Water that has been released from homes, hospitals, or industry after it has been used or altered. It may contains significant concentrations of environmental pollutants.
References in periodicals archive ?
For treated wastewater and river water, 1 L was directly concentrated with polyethylene glycol.
The discharge contained salts, bacteria and other inorganic matter believed to have come from water-softener systems used by some residents and from the park's wastewater treatment plant, water officials said.
electricity production goes into water and wastewater treatment, says Bruce Logan of Pennsylvania State University in University Park.
This is a big advantage for harvesting energy from wastewater, which is microbially diverse, says Angenent.
Process Design Manual, Land Treatment of Municipal Wastewater, EPA, USACOE, Department of the Interior, (EPA 625/1-81-013).
In addition to the benefits of irrigation, the SIL Cleanwater Project is expected to eliminate nuisance odors usually associated with wastewater treatment, greatly reduce sludge generation, and offer lower operating costs than the conventional sewage treatment plants.
Anderson, who served for a brief period of time on the District's board of directors as a representative for the union, alerted the workers to EPA's plan to pipe wastewater from Lowry into Denver's sewage system.
Using treated wastewater in agriculture requires extra care in wastewater management to avoid environmental and public health hazards; and the reliance on fossil water of the supply of water can be justified when there is no other source for the supply for municipal water at affordable costs.
First, it allows new sub-divisions to be built where the cost of laying pipelines to municipal wastewater treatment systems would otherwise have been prohibitive.
SECONDARY AERATION TANK Wastewater mixes with air and microorganisms.
Frederick's newest site is at Franklinton, where he and fellow professor Carlyle Franklin are using an existing pine forest to process wastewater from an industrial plant that produces laundry detergent enzymes.
In dry weather, a combined sewer system sends a town's entire volume of wastewater to a sewage plant, which treats and discharges it into a waterway.