warm-blooded animal


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ho·me·o·therm

(hō'mē-ō-therm),
Any animals, including mammals and birds, that tend to maintain a constant body temperature.
[homeo- + G. thermos, warm]

warm-blooded animal

An animal whose body temperature remains constant regardless of the temperature of the environment.
Synonym: endotherm
See also: animal

warm-blooded animal

see HOMOIOTHERM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those two bacteria are also found in the intestines of warm-blooded animals.
coli, a common inhabitant of the gut of warm-blooded animals, are harmless.
For the small comfort it offers, it is good that the Department of Agriculture has agreed to classify as warm-blooded animals rats, mice, and birds, as intended by the Animal Welfare Act of 1966.
CAT scans of dinosaur nasal structure clearly suggested that dinosaurs were not warm-blooded, since they lacked the nasal turbinates that warm-blooded animals use to prevent excess heat and water loss white breathing.
Obnoxious and destructive, the screwworm is the only insect known to consume the living flesh of warm-blooded animals.
Toxoplasma is arguably the most successful animal parasite on earth: It infects hundreds of species of warm-blooded animals, most notably half of humanity.
All warm-blooded animals can get infected through ingestion of these oocysts.
Through Delta's Pet First program, a service designed to address the special needs of warm-blooded animals shipped as cargo without their owner, customers may take advantage of Delta's special care and handling at each cargo facility.
Department of Agriculture with safeguarding domestic warm-blooded animals from neglect and abuse.
The ticks' only food is the blood sucked from their hosts, which are usually warm-blooded animals.
coli) is one of the many species of bacteria that is naturally found in the lower intestines of warm-blooded animals.
The idea is that warm-blooded animals spend much of their energy generating heat to keep the body warm.