walking cast


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cast

 [kast]
1. a positive copy of an object.
2. to make such a copy.
3. a mold of a tube or hollow organ (such as a renal tubule or bronchiole), formed of effused matter and eliminated from the body. See also urinary cast.
4. a positive copy or mold of the tissues of the jaws, made in an impression, and over which denture bases or other restorations may be fabricated.
6. a stiff dressing or casing, usually made of plaster of Paris, used to immobilize body parts.
Patient Care. If the patient is confined to bed after a plaster of Paris cast is applied, it is necessary to provide a firm mattress protected by a waterproof material. Several small pillows should be available for placing under the curves of the cast to prevent remolding or cracking of the plaster and to provide adequate support of the patient. When handling a wet cast only the palm or flat of the hand is used so that the fingertips will not make indentations that might produce pressure against the patient's skin.

While the cast is drying it is left uncovered to allow circulation of air around it. Extreme heat should not be used to hasten drying of a plaster of Paris cast, as this may produce burns under the cast. Synthetic casts, however, may be set or cured with heat. To minimize crumbling of the edges and irritation of the skin around and under the cast, a strip of stockinette or adhesive tape is applied so that the rim of the cast is thoroughly covered. Observation of the patient for signs of impaired circulation, pressure against a nerve, or compartmental syndrome is extremely important. Any numbness, recurrent pain, or tingling should be reported at once. If a limb is enclosed in a cast it should be elevated to reduce swelling. Cyanosis or blanching of the fingers or toes extending from a cast usually indicates impaired blood flow, which may lead to serious complications if not corrected immediately.
renal cast (urinary cast) a cast formed from gelled protein precipitated in the renal tubules and molded to the tubular lumen; pieces of these casts break off and are washed out with the urine. Types named for their constituent material include epithelial, granular, hyaline, and waxy casts. In renal disease, casts may be seen containing red or white blood cells.
walking cast a lower extremity cast with an attached heel or other support so that the patient is able to ambulate while the cast is in place.

walking cast

Etymology: AS, wealcan, to roam; ONorse, kasta
a cast that permits a patient to walk. See also long-leg cast with walker, short-leg cast with walker.

walking cast

Orthopedics A leg cast that approximates and immobilizes bone fragments without compromising ambulation. See Cast.

Aircast boot

removable lower-limb bi-valve walking cast that allows ambulation whilst maintaining the foot in a non-weight-bearing condition

cast

1. a positive copy of an object, e.g. a mold of a hollow organ (a renal tubule, bronchiole, etc.), formed of effused plastic matter and extruded from the body, as a urinary cast; named according to constituents, as epithelial, fatty, waxy, etc.
2. a restraint procedure used in horses and cattle, and occasionally in large beasts such as elephants, to pull them to the ground so that surgical procedures can be performed. Used less nowadays than previously because of the advent of new anesthetic techniques. There are many techniques and special harnesses for special purposes.
3. an animal lies down but is unable to right itself into a position of sternal recumbency so that it can rise, e.g. a horse in a loose box when it is lying too close to a wall, a sheep in heavy fleece in wet weather. When helped to the sternal posture the animal is able to rise.
4. to form an object in a mold, as a replica of teeth made in an impression.
5. a stiff dressing or casing, usually made of plaster of Paris, used to immobilize body parts. More modern, lightweight casts are made of polyurethane resins.
6. strabismus.
7. culled, e.g. cast for age.
8. shedding of velvet by deer stags and bucks.

full leg cast
see long-leg cast (below).
half cast
see walking cast (below).
long-leg cast
a rigid material, usually plaster of Paris, is applied from the toes to as high as possible over the humerus or femur. Used for immobilization of fractures of the radius, ulna or tibia.
renal c's
see urinary casts (below).
stone cast
a reproduction of the jaw and dentition made from powdered gypsum stone and water in an impression mold.
urinary c's
precipitates of mucoprotein or plasma protein in the shape of the renal tubular laminae in which they form, often with cellular elements. Observed in the examination of urinary sediment, they indicate renal tubular or epithelial damage. Hyaline casts are composed of mucoproteins or plasma proteins without formed cellular elements. Waxy, granular, epithelial, erythrocyte and leukocyte casts may occur, each representing a type of cellular reaction or stage of degeneration within the cast. Fatty casts are formed from degenerating tubular epithelial cells and, particularly in cats, lipid in these cells. Casts may dissolve in alkaline urine. Called also cylindroids.
Enlarge picture
Red cell cast in urine sediment. By permission from Meyer D, Raskin RE, Atlas of Canine and Feline Cytology, Saunders, 2001
walking cast
one that does not extend above the elbow or stifle, thereby permitting movement of those joints so that the animal can walk on the leg. Suitable for fractures of the metacarpus or metatarsus.
References in periodicals archive ?
The briefcase contains paperwork completed at home, the biscuits are for the facility's dog, and the sandal attempts to match, and minimize, the walking cast on her other foot.
One man with a broken leg in a walking cast did it in two seconds.
Non-surgical treatments often are recommended for younger children in whom the muscles have not become overly tight and may include physical therapy to stretch the posterior calf muscle, braces and night splints to stretch the heel cord and stabilize ankle movement, or a walking cast below the knee.
Yesterday's walking cast included Yorkshire's former England bowler Matthew Hoggard.