waist circumference


Also found in: Acronyms.

waist circumference

A gauge of abdominal obesity, obtained by measuring the abdomen at the level of the superior iliac crest with a tape measure. Among non-Asian American males, a waist circumference greater than 40 in (102 cm) increases the risk of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and heart disease. A circumference greater than 35 in (88 cm) conveys similar risks for non-Asian American women. Americans of Asian ancestry have a lower risk of obesity than African Americans, European Americans, and Hispanics. Among Asians risks rise for men with a waist line that measures 36 in (91 cm) and for women when the waist exceeds 32 in (81 cm). See: waist-to-hip ratio

Patient care

To measure an individual’s waist, have the patient face away from the care provider with hands placed on the top of the hipbones or iliac crests. This spot should them be marked on each hip, using a felt-tip pen or skin marker. A measuring tape is then placed around the patient at the level of the iliac crests. It should be parallel to the floor and snug but not tight enough to dent the skin. The patient then exhales normally, and the measurement is taken and recorded. Weight loss should be encouraged when waist circumferences exceed guidelines, or when the body mass index is greater than 25 kg/m2, using dietary modification and exercise. Physical activity should consist of more than 35 min of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise daily (unless contraindicated). Brisk walking is a good choice for most individuals, although any form of exercise that a patient finds enjoyable should be encouraged.

waist circumference

A measurement that has been shown to be a valid index identifying people who need weight management if they are to avoid a significant risk of heart attacks. Waist circumferences of more than 94 cm in men and more than 80 cm in women indicate danger.
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: BMI, Leptin, Obesity, Waist circumference.
And they conclude: 'Changes in eating habits can affect obesity, BMI, and waist circumference.
The authors concluded: "Changes in eating habits can affect obesity, BMI, and waist circumference.
The simpler MyPlate approach may be easier for primary care patients to sustain long term than the calorie-counting approach and has equal waist circumference reduction outcomes, supporting the U.
He says that although monitoring BMI is sensible and will help identify people who are overweight, in most cases, he believes waist circumference (divided by height, square-rooted) would be a more accurate measurement.
15] MUAC correlates significantly both with abdominal adiposity (measured by waist circumference or WHR) along with overall adiposity (as measured by BMI and body fat).
Waist circumference was measured just above iliac crest, at the end of normal expiration, in the fasting stage with the subject standing, erect, and looking straight forward with feet shoulder width apart and arm crossed over chest in a relaxed manner and observer taking a position to the right side of patients body on one knee, using a nonstretchable flexible tape with spring-loaded mechanism to standardize tape tension during measurement.
Waist circumference (WC) was measured in centimeters at the mid-point between the lower border of the last rib and the iliac crest, at the end of a normal expiration, using a non-elastic tape measure (6).
Each 10-dB increase in average road traffic noise exposure over 5 years was associated with an average increase in waist circumference of 0.
In the IDF criteria, central obesity is a prerequisite (6) and central obesity assessment by waist circumference for different genders and ethnic groups according to IDF is necessary.
Also included in the measurement of the waist circumference (WC) as an indicator for central obesity because it is a good predictor of abdominal fat and is more closely related to the development of cardio-vascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus [8] in both children and adults [9-10].