vomitory


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emetic

 [e-met´ik]
1. causing vomiting.
2. an agent that does this; examples are a strong solution of salt, mustard water, powdered ipecac, and ipecac syrup. Emetics should not be used when lye or other strong alkalis or acids have been swallowed, since vomiting may rupture the already weakened walls of the esophagus. Examples of such acids and alkalis are sodium hydroxide (caustic soda), potassium hydroxide (caustic potash), and carbolic acid. Emetics should also be avoided when kerosene, gasoline, nail polish remover, or lacquer thinner has been swallowed, since vomiting of these substances may draw them into the lungs.

vomitory

/vom·i·to·ry/ (vom´i-tor″e) emetic.

vomitory

(vŏm′ĭ-tôr′ē)
adj.
Inducing vomiting; vomitive.
n. pl. vomito·ries
1. Something that induces vomiting.
2. An aperture through which matter is discharged.
3. See vomitorium.

vomitory

an emetic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Horace "knows" he isn't the stain--knows he is not the vomitory (no)thing that Popeye reflects back to him--because he has already learned that this stain refers to a female emission, and it's in the name of exactly this "knowledge" that he in fact flees from his wife in the first place.
The vomitory confusion between inside and outside--which threatens the subject with self-consumption at the hands of a bad object outside-within--is stabilized by an optics that no longer finds a "self" in the object at all, but projects the threat of psychic self-canceling onto a feminine externality whose revealing-concealing natural artifice formally repeats the original experience of being a self-negating nothing.
Popeye's hand is her father's hand--and her father's hand is Popeye's--since if Popeye is on one hand "Daddy," Judge Drake is on the other Popeye, both in the mode of vomitory (no)thing and of its sexually violative denial.
To be smeared, on the other hand, by the novel, into its vomitory textures, is to be forced to "see" oneself instead as Popeye-Temple: victim and victimizer, subject and object, eye and mouth, culture and nature--and of course, perhaps most importantly, masculine-feminine, (wo)man.
129; my emphasis), we might in the light of what we have gathered rewrite the statement as follows: the vomitory (no)thing which I try to call "woman" is one that "corrupts" because it's already (in) me, and because the novel demands "I" consume it in a ruinously masculine and ocular ingestion that prevents the thematic imbibing of significance.