vocal tic


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vocal tic

n.
An abrupt exclamation, utterance, or other vocalization, especially as produced by a person with Tourette syndrome.

vocal tic

Phonic tic Neurology An involuntary sound produced by moving air through the nose, mouth, or throat; VTs include throat-clearing sounds and sniffing to grunts to verbalizations of syllables and words, utterances of inappropriate, undesired statements or obscenities or coprolalia Types Simple–single sounds–eg, throat clearing, barking, sniffing; complex–verbalizations–expression of words–eg, coprolalia, echolalia, palilalia–repeating of person's own words; VTs frequently change and vary in severity over time; remissions and exacerbations are common. See Tourette syndrome. Cf Motor tic.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the patient had no past history of motor or vocal tic , motor tics in the form of elevating the shoulder and blinking were noted in the father.
The patient described in this report had a history of multiple motor and vocal tics that waxed and waned for 6 years, starting at the age of 10.
Diagnostic criteria for Tourette syndrome include 1) the presence of multiple motor and one or more vocal tics at some time during the illness, although not necessarily concurrently; 2) occurrence of tics many times a day, nearly every day, or intermittently throughout a period of more than 1 year, with no tic-free period of more than 3 consecutive months; 3) onset before age 18 years; and 4) symptoms not caused by direct physiologic effects of a substance or a general medical condition (1).
Brief functional analysis and treatment of a vocal tic.
Some children develop motor or vocal tics, obsessions, compulsions, or combinations of these symptoms shortly after a streptococcal infection, such as strep throat.
When the relation of the quality of life scores reported by the child and parents with YGTSS scores was analysed, it was found that the psychosocial health scores reported by the child and total health scores had a weakly positive correlation with YGTSS vocal tic score.
Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder starting at childhood, and is characterized with multiple motor tics and at least one or more vocal tic (1).
You diagnose Sammy with Tourette syndrome because he meets DSM-IV-TR criteria of at least 2 motor tics and 1 vocal tic that have persisted for 1 year without more than a 3-month, hiatus, with tic onset before age 18.
In fact, the diagnosis of an individual can change over time, from a transient tic disorder, or chronic motor or vocal tic disorder, to TS.
The key to any impression is a little vocal tic, which you then exaggerate.
The current DSM criteria state that the individual must have multiple motor tics plus at least one vocal tic, and, although there can be variability and periodicity, they should occur many times a day for at least 1 year.
Vocal tics typically include grunting, throat clearing and repeating words and phrases.