vivisection

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vivisection

 [viv″ĭ-sek´shun]
surgical procedures performed upon a living animal for purpose of physiologic or pathologic investigation.

viv·i·sec·tion

(viv'i-sek'shŭn),
Any cutting operation on a living animal for purposes of experimentation; often extended to denote any form of animal experimentation.
[vivi- + section]

vivisection

/vivi·sec·tion/ (viv″ĭ-sek´shun) surgical procedures performed upon a living animal for purpose of physiologic or pathologic investigation.

vivisection

(vĭv′ĭ-sĕk′shən, vĭv′ĭ-sĕk′-)
n.
The act or practice of cutting into or otherwise injuring living animals for the purpose of scientific research.

viv′i·sec′tion·al adj.
viv′i·sec′tion·al·ly adv.
viv′i·sec′tion·ist n.

vivisection

[viv′əsek′shən]
Etymology: L, vivus, alive, secare, to cut
the performance of surgical operations on living animals, particularly experimental surgery for the purpose of research.

viv·i·sec·tion

(viv'i-sek'shŭn)
Any cutting operation on a living animal for purposes of experimentation; often extended to denote any form of animal experimentation.
[vivi- + section]

vivisection

1. Experiments performed on living animals involving surgery.
2. Any scientific work in which live animals are used.

vivisection (viˈ·v·sekˑ·shn),

n the dissection of living animals to view anatomic systems.

vivisection

surgical procedures performed upon a living animal for purpose of physiological or pathological investigation. It is illegal in most countries to perform such experiments without a license, without proper anesthesia or without all measures necessary to prevent cruelty to the experimental animal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cumulatively, these efforts of the vivisectionists contributed to a growing acceptance of research conducted on live animals as essential to medical progress.
There are similarities among these tools of pornography, the design of contemporary gynaecological chairs used to hold women and make their bodies accessible to the surgeon, and trade catalogues of vivisectionist apparatus, which were often displayed with 'photographs and drawings of animals fixed to boards with straps and cords, together with an array of scalpels and ovens, vices and saws'.
Vivisectionists ridiculed the antivivisection offensive.
In "Vivisection as a Sign of the Times" Carroll questions the evolutionary superiority of the vivisectionist over his experimental subject as well as those who have not transcended their sympathy for the brute creation: "Is the anatomist, who can contemplate unmoved the agonies he is inflicting, for no higher purpose than to gratify a scientific curiosity, or to illustrate some well-established truth, a being higher or lower, in the scale of humanity, than the ignorant boor whose very soul would sicken at the horrid sight?
Vivisectionists won't claim the money because they don't have and can't produce any such evidence.
These days, vivisectionists refuse to debate with me.
A death list of leading vivisectionists has been sent to Scotland Yard and police forces nationwide are on alert.
On national BBC Radio recently I began a live two-hour programme by challenging vivisectionists to phone in with details of any specific medical advance they claimed had been brought about through animal experiments.
The woolly thinking of the vivisectionists never fails to amaze me.
Some years ago - when there were vivisectionists around still brave enough to debate with me - a woman with whom I was discussing animal experimentation ended her speech by claiming that animals do not have souls.
Moreover, it showed that vivisectionists are "aggressive individuals who hold considerable hostility towards others".