vivisectionist


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vivisectionist

 [viv″ĭ-sek´shun-ist]
one who practices or defends vivisection.

viv·i·sec·tion·ist

, vivisector (viv'i-sek'shŭn-ist, vi-vi-sek'tŏr),
One who practices vivisection.

viv·i·sec·tion·ist

, vivisector (viv'i-sek'shŭn-ist, -sek'tŏr)
One who practices vivisection.

vivisectionist

one who practices or defends vivisection.
References in periodicals archive ?
problems" and as "material for experimental physiology" (Ryder 158) explains why, for Charles Bernard and the vivisectionists, a dog like Caro is "lost material," while for Miriam and the middle-class readership of the novel, Caro is a "gentle fellow-creature" (191, 202).
Here Prendick betrays, in Moreau's terms, both his link to animality through his empathy with pain, and also, in contemporary vivisectionist discourse, his link to female sentimentality.
actually occur in real human populations and obtains important, fundamental results otherwise unobtainable by "whole armies" of vivisectionists "conducting absurd studies on animals" (p.
A grisly pile of shoes left by victims of a vivisectionist killer, the "mad butcher of Cleveland," sits at stage right and continues to mount during the show.
Invoking a standard vivisectionist refrain, Dana claimed that zoophilists cared nothing for human suffering, only animal suffering.
true that as a social vivisectionist she fills her stories with period arrivistes, dour Protestants, intellectual frauds, the small minds that often accompany large fortunes.
maintains, the vivisectionist exemplifies with his impassive suppression
On a clothesline in Department of Tropical Research hang shirts and pants, reminders of the bodies that animate this gear--which, in turn, remind us of the various roles Dion takes on: tropical explorer, archaeologist of the mundane, entomologist, paleontologist, spelunker, romantic traveler, vivisectionist, and so on.
9) In The Magician's Nephew vengeance is taken against the vivisectionist Uncle Andrew; similarly, in Lewis's science fiction novels for adults, it is taken against those who experiment cruelly with animals.
In The Island of Doctor Moreau, the vivisectionist Moreau sculpts not animals out of people, like the disillusioned Rubek, but people out of animals.
He grudgingly agrees to take Colin out for a walk only to see him kidnapped by an evil vivisectionist.
In The Fortnightly Review, John Bridges described the vivisectionist as a kind of "scientific geographer at home" obtaining "precise knowledge of the geographical structure of a country, of the elevation of its plateaux and mountain ranges, of the geological features, and of the average rainfall in different latitudes and longitudes.