vitreous detachment


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vit·re·ous de·tach·ment

separation of the peripheral vitreous humor from the retina.

vit·re·ous de·tach·ment

(vit'rē-ŭs dĕ-tach'mĕnt)
Separation of the peripheral vitreous humor from the retina.

vitreous detachment

Separation of the rear part of the VITREOUS BODY from the retina as a result of the natural shrinkage that occurs in the elderly. Perception of flahes, floating specks or moving clouds may be a conspicuous, but often temporary, feature of the process.

vitreous detachment 

Separation of the vitreous body from the internal limiting membrane of the retina due to shrinkage from degenerative or inflammatory conditions, trauma, progressive myopia, old age, diabetes and in aphakic eyes in which the lens extraction was intracapsular. The most common cases are elderly individuals in whom the posterior part of the vitreous, which becomes liquid, detaches from the internal limiting membrane (called posterior vitreous detachment, PVD). Symptoms are flashes, floaters and photopsia because as the eye moves the vitreous body comes into contact with the retina. The condition is sometimes associated with retinal tears and retinal detachment. See retinal break; syneresis.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, OCT is the 'gold standard' for detecting vitreous detachment, which can cause retinal detachment.
20pm patient's retina shows no damage but a posterior vitreous detachment, where the membrane separates from the retina.
In idiopathic ERMs, it is probable that the development of a spontaneous posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) causes micro-trauma at the retinal surface particularly at points that generally have a stronger vitreoretinal adhesion such as the vitreofoveal interface and optic disc; this allows Muller cells to migrate through the microscopic breaks onto the retinal surface and contribute to the development of an ERM.
Posterior vitreous detachment, a condition that occurs in three-quarters of people over 65 and is the result of changes in the jelly-like liquid as the eye gets older.
Serious side effects related to the injection procedure are rare but can occur including infection inside the eye, retinal detachment, cataract, increased pressure in the eye, and vitreous detachment.
Write to him at Dr Neil, Sunday Mail, One Central Quay, Glasgow G3 8DA The eye clinic told me I had vitreous detachment but not to worry.
One of the topics in this session will be to explore whether pharmacological vitreolysis has the potential to induce total posterior vitreous detachment without the need for surgery.
0% or more) reported in patients receiving EYLEA were conjunctival hemorrhage, eye pain, vitreous detachment, cataract, vitreous floaters, and increased intraocular pressure.
Coverage also includes understanding and treating refractive, eye movement, and alignment disorders, and disorders of the cornea, conjunctiva, sclera, iris, pupil, macula, optic nerve, retina, vitreous, and uvea, such as cataracts, conjunctivitis, pink eye, macular degeneration, uveitis, iritis, vitreous detachment, floaters, and glaucoma, and eyeglasses and contact lenses, LASIK and LASEK surgery, photorefractive keratectomy surgery, and phakic intraocular lenses.
Problems remain with the purely mechanical surgery however, and enzymes have been developed that cleave the vitreoretinal junction without damaging the retina, allowing vitreolysis and the induction of posterior vitreous detachment without vitrectomy.
Scar tissue may form on the macula due to conditions such as vitreous detachment (in which the aging vitreous breaks down, leading to floaters), retinal tear, retinal detachment, ocular inflammation, eye injuries, or retinal blood vessel abnormalities such as diabetic retinopathy or retinal vein occlusion.
Initial funduscopic examination showed posterior vitreous detachment.