vitiation


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vit·i·a·tion

(vish-ē-ā'shŭn),
A change that impairs use or reduces efficiency.
[L. vitiatio fr. vitio, pp. vitiatus, to corrupt, fr. vitium, vice]

vitiation

A near-extinct term for the debilitation, deterioration or weakening of a process or condition.

vit·i·a·tion

(vish'ē-ā'shŭn)
A change that impairs use or reduces efficiency.
[L. vitiatio fr. vitio, pp. vitiatus, to corrupt, fr. vitium, vice]

vit·i·a·tion

(vish'ē-ā'shŭn)
Change that impairs use or reduces efficiency.
[L. vitiatio fr. vitio, pp. vitiatus, to corrupt, fr. vitium, vice]
References in periodicals archive ?
Through a series of systematic experiments, these researchers showed conclusively that the mechanism of air vitiation was a physical rather than a chemical phenomenon.
supra note 89, at 67-68 (describing differing approaches to vitiation of relationship district court judges employ).
Ofunne abandons matrimony because it becomes the symbol of her vitiation.
Does this make the owner subject to a potential claim for fraud, or vitiation of the lease that the tenant signed, or damages?
They were also inflected with the drive for self-determination, a defining trait in anticolonial movements in the decolonization of Africa, Asia, and Latin America which emerged in the post-World War II era by oppressed nations who saw opportunity in the vitiation of European hegemony and its ideology of white supremacy.
OLS REGRESSION ESTIMATES OF THE PENALTY ASSESSED AGAINST A FACILITY IN VITIATION OF THE CWA, 2000-2003 Variable Coefficient State per Capita 17.
For the impact of 1948 was as much about the increase in state power, damage to non-communist left parties and unions, and vitiation of legal safeguards and approaches, as it was about violence per se.
It was remarked earlier in this essay that Longo's diptych can be interpreted as the vitiation of human vitality associated with increasing thermal entropy.
The Club members are to varying degrees examples of the vitiation of public school manliness.
A disease known since antiquity, typhus has been described as follows: "A kind of continued fever, attended with great prostration of the nervous and vascular systems, with a tendency to putrefaction in the fluids and vitiation in the secretions; putrid fever.
There is an important distinction between notice of a pre-existing equitable interest and notice of the vitiation of the other party's intention to enter the transaction.
Patent Infringement, and the Growing Importance of the Claim Vitiation Defense, in PATENT LITIGATION 2005, at 45, 51 (PLI Patents, Copyrights, Trademarks, and Literary Property Court Handbook Series No.