visual reception

visual reception

Visual decoding Psychology The ability to comprehend the meaning of symbols, written 'sight words', pictures, and other concrete objects; visual reception can be compromised because of difficulties in spacial perception or figure-ground
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Contract notice: Market Unterhalts maintenance and troubleshooting of the radio broadcast facilities / sound and visual reception lmh heritage.
In all likelihood, this is one of the reasons for his serious interest in "music" for visual reception, which, together with an interest in the fine arts, he began demonstrating during the 1920s.
But he did not conceive visual reception as mere watching of colour combinations that during the performance, as a result of the existence of the colour-tone relation, are projected on to a film screen.
All his paintings, basically using the watercolour technique, are music-related: either designs of covers for his own compositions or compositions presented together with Alois Haba pieces, or artefacts representing a specific "music" for visual reception.
Those tests found increased language performance, visual reception, and motor control performance in the breastfed group.
Sperber's works challenge our understanding of visual reception and Wilson's our notions of creative vision.
Cutting across disciplinary boundaries and focusing on "the visual reception of a literary text" (4), the contributors use a variety of techniques to explore Dante and the Commedia beyond literary confines.
Karl Enenkel's very long essay, fully supported with visual prints, "Der Petrarca des 'Petrarca-Meisters': Zum Text-Bild-Verhaltnis in Illustrierten De Remediis-Ausgaben," presents a persuasive argument for how visual reception (interpretation via illustration, or illumination, for example) can transform a text's "intended" meaning, as Petrarch's Christian humanism becomes Lutheran polemic against Roman Catholicism.
The study concludes by summarizing Starkey's approach to the medieval book, which was composed by authors who were conscious of the visual reception of their work by their early 13th century audience, and for whom "reading" a text meant largely "visualizing" it.
There were no differences in children's receptive language or visual reception.
This practice implements generalized stimulation through auditory, and visual reception, and oral expressive modalities.