visual neglect

visual neglect

a condition in wich aspects of visual stimulus are ignored by the subject, due to various cortical abnormalities.

vis·u·al ne·glect

(vizh'ū-ăl nĕ-glekt')
Inattention to visual stimuli or information occurring in the visual field of the involved side of the body.

visual neglect 

A rare phenomenon in which a patient can see all of the visual field binocularly but somehow ignores objects on one side (e.g. patient may draw a diagram omitting one side or shave only one side of the face). It is due to a lesion of the brain (e.g. a stroke), most often in the right cortex and the patient, although conscious of objects in the left visual field does not pay attention to them. The impairment occurs in the posterior parietal lobe, which receives projections from the primary visual cortex. A confrontation visual field test in which objects are presented to both sides simultaneously often facilitates detection of the condition. See extinction phenomenon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Damage to several different sites--but usually the parietal lobe--may cause a loss of awareness of one side of space; (35,36) this is known as unilateral visual neglect.
Prevalence rates for peripheral visual field loss (such as homonymous hemianopia) vary from 14% to 20% (Brahm, Wilgenburg, Kirby, Ingalla, Chang & Goodrich, 2007), while visual neglect has a prevalence rate of 43% (Ringman, 2004).
Visual neglect is a common deficit after unilateral brain injury, particularly following strokes centered on the right superior and inferior parietal lobes; however, other influential areas also exist, including the frontal lobes, anterior cingulate cortex, frontal eye fields, basal ganglia, and thalamus (32-38).
All nine patients studied with the detection test had visual neglect in both neuropsychological and visual detection tests.
Selection of acute stroke patients for treatment of visual neglect.
A simple method to dissociate sensory-attentional and motor-intentional biases in unilateral visual neglect.
One in twenty PRC, but none of the PNS, patients exhibited symptoms of visual neglect.
In extreme cases, patients with visual neglect may eat only the food on the right side of their plate, or shave only half of their face.
The result often is not only the expected amelioration of visual neglect, but also of tactile, motor, and even representational neglect (Rossetti & Rode, 2002).
In visual neglect, awareness of information in the left visual hemifield is impaired (Danckert & Ferber, 2005; Driver & Vuilleumier, 2001; Driver et al.

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