viscosity


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Related to viscosity: Viscosity index

viscosity

 [vis-kos´ĭ-te]
resistance to flow; a physical property of a substance that is dependent on the friction of its component molecules as they slide by one another.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē),
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion; most frequently applied to liquids as the resistance of a fluid to flow because of a shearing force.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]

viscosity

/vis·cos·i·ty/ (vis-kos´ĭ-te) resistance to flow; a physical property of a substance that is dependent on the friction of its component molecules as they slide by one another.

viscosity

[viskos′itē]
Etymology: L, viscosus, sticky
the ability or inability of a fluid solution to flow easily. A solution that has high viscosity is relatively thick and flows slowly because of the adhesive effect of adjacent molecules. - viscid, viscous, adj.

viscosity

An MRI term for a measure of a fluid’s resistance to deformity by shear or tensile stress, which affects its mobility and therefore its intensity in an image.

viscosity

The tendency of a fluid to resist flow or the quality of resistance to flow; viscosity is measured with a viscometer to assess hyperviscosity syndromes associated with monoclonal gammopathies, rheumatoid arthritis, SLE, hyperfibrinogenemia Ref range 1.4-1.8 relative to water. See Apparent viscosity. Cf Specific gravity.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē)
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion; most frequently applied to liquids as the resistance of a fluid to flow because of a shearing force.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]

viscosity

  1. the property of stickiness by which substances resist change of shape.
  2. a measure of the ease with which layers of fluid pass each other.

viscosity

the property of a fluid medium that provides resistance to motion of the fluid itself or of an object moving through it. Also can be considered to be friction within fluids.

viscosity

resistance to flow/deformation, due to molecular cohesion

viscosity (vis·kôˑ·s·tē),

n the degree of resistance of a liquid to flow.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē)
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]

viscosity (viskos´itē),

n the ability or inability of a fluid solution to flow easily. High viscosity indicates a slowflowing fluid.

viscosity

resistance to flow; a physical property of a substance that is dependent on the friction of its component molecules as they slide by one another.
References in periodicals archive ?
Equation 9 is used to determine the bulk viscosity from the uniaxial compression.
Caption: Figure 3--pressure dependent coefficients in two different viscosity models
The viscosity of all studied oils decreased as the temperature increased.
Note that as the shear rate becomes higher, the difference in viscosity between the two materials decreases.
Plasma viscosity refers to the viscosity of the noncellular matrix of the blood.
Stable and precise temperature control, essential for accurate viscosity measurements, is also a challenge.
The accuracy and ability of each mentioned correlation for predicting oil viscosity was checked with experimental data and Figs.
The sliding vane positive displacement meter has been the first choice for measurement since the 1930s; however, in the last 10-15 years other technologies have emerged that can offer improved cost/benefit ratios, depending on the viscosity and temperature of the fluid and the required accuracy of the meter.
The additional viscosity measurement function in Promass I is also ideal for improving process control and efficiency.
Is there an easier, more reliable way to monitor the product viscosity and determine the end of the reaction other than the classical manual sampling and laboratory testing?
APPLICATION: The capillary-coriolis viscometer can reliably measure on-line the viscosity and density of kraft black liquors, including liquors with very high solids content.