virtue

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Related to virtues: Theological virtues

virtue

 [vir´choo]
in bioethics, a trait of character that disposes a person habitually to excellence of intent and performance with respect to the telos proper to life as a human being or to a specific activity or role in life. Some virtues (such as cleanliness) are important socially rather than morally. (See also morality.) Virtues in medicine include trustworthiness, compassion, phronesis, justice, fortitude, temperance, integrity, and self-effacement.
References in classic literature ?
However that may be, it is an incontrovertible fact that the things which in virtue of these qualities are said to be what they are vary in the degree in which they possess them; for one man is said to be better versed in grammar, or more healthy or just, than another, and so on.
One thing is like another only with reference to that in virtue of which it is such and such; thus this forms the peculiar mark of quality.
The knowledge of grammar is not relative to anything external, nor is the knowledge of music, but these, if relative at all, are relative only in virtue of their genera; thus grammar is said be the knowledge of something, not the grammar of something; similarly music is the knowledge of something, not the music of something.
Those particular branches, therefore, of knowledge, in virtue of which we are sometimes said to be such and such, are themselves qualities, and are not relative.
Virtue is knowledge, and therefore virtue can be taught.
To the doctrine that virtue is knowledge, Plato has been constantly tending in the previous Dialogues.
He would not have preferred the poet or man of action to the philosopher, or the virtue of custom to the virtue based upon ideas.
Characteristic also of the temper of the Socratic enquiry is, (4) the proposal to discuss the teachableness of virtue under an hypothesis, after the manner of the mathematicians; and (5) the repetition of the favourite doctrine which occurs so frequently in the earlier and more Socratic Dialogues, and gives a colour to all of them--that mankind only desire evil through ignorance; (6) the experiment of eliciting from the slave-boy the mathematical truth which is latent in him, and (7) the remark that he is all the better for knowing his ignorance.
His definition of virtue as 'the power and desire of attaining things honourable,' like the first definition of justice in the Republic, is taken from a poet.
The city will be courageous in virtue of a portion of herself which preserves under all circumstances that opinion about the nature of things to be feared and not to be feared in which our legislator educated them; and this is what you term courage.
Yes, I replied; I will; and as far as I can at present see, the virtue of temperance has more of the nature of harmony and symphony than the preceding.
And the virtue which enters into this competition is justice?