virtue


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virtue

 [vir´choo]
in bioethics, a trait of character that disposes a person habitually to excellence of intent and performance with respect to the telos proper to life as a human being or to a specific activity or role in life. Some virtues (such as cleanliness) are important socially rather than morally. (See also morality.) Virtues in medicine include trustworthiness, compassion, phronesis, justice, fortitude, temperance, integrity, and self-effacement.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first is that, in the stages of virtue acquisition before full virtue is reached, the same domain could harbor different levels of different virtues.
In the Aristotelian scheme, magnanimity is a moral virtue as it is a middle state between vanity, which is deeming oneself unjustifiably worthy of great things, and smallness of spirit, being worthy of great things but not claiming them.
Indeed, as Maryanne Horowitz has shown in her Seeds of Virtue and Knowledge, the seeds-of-virtue metaphor has been a staple of Western thought since the Stoics, and of Cicero in particular.
Be it a tale of Appreciation involving Lou Gehrig, Nobility involving Jackie Robinson, or Unity involving Olympic hockey teams, "The Book of Sports Virtues" is a collection of virtue and should be read by any coach or sports educator who want to impart good sportsmanship on their students.
Inverness is a last bastion of civilisation surrounded by wilderness and sees itself as a centre of virtue.
Most libertarians, he continued, share the conservatives' alarm about the "erosion of both public and private virtues" but regard individual liberty as the highest value and free choice as the prerequisite for true virtue.
is, 'You test virtue X by asking how X contributes to the purpose, end, telos of the society, what [Frank H] Knight called the "moral habitability of the world"' (p.
By virtue of their profession, doctors and nurses have more stringent obligations of beneficence than most.
The cult was central to Qing political culture, "making female virtue integral to imperial state building and the civilizing project that legitimated it (13).
The contractual ethos of liberalism with its supreme valuation of individual freedom destroys Christian virtue on Hauerwas's view.
In the last analysis, republican government rests more on virtue than on freedom; otherwise put, genuine freedom is oriented toward virtue and especially toward duty and self-sacrifice.