virion


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Related to virion: viroid, prion

virion

 [vi´re-on]
the complete viral particle, found extracellularly and capable of surviving in crystalline form and infecting a living cell; it comprises the nucleoid (genetic material) and the capsid.

vi·ri·on

(vī'rē-on, vir'ē-on),
The complete virus particle that is structurally intact and infectious.

virion

/vi·ri·on/ (vi´re-on) the complete viral particle, found extracellularly and capable of surviving in crystalline form and infecting a living cell; it comprises the nucleoid (genetic material) and the capsid.

virion

(vī′rē-ŏn′, vîr′ē-)
n.
A complete viral particle, consisting of RNA or DNA surrounded by a protein shell and constituting the infective form of a virus.

virion

[vir′ē·on, vī′rē·on]
Etymology: L, virus, poison
a single virus particle with a central nucleoid surrounded by a protein coat or capsid. The complete nucleocapsid with a nucleic acid core may constitute a complete virus, such as the adenoviruses and the picornaviruses, or it may be surrounded by an envelope, as in the herpesviruses and the myxoviruses. Such an envelope is a membrane that contains lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates and projects spikelike structures from its surface. See also capsid.

vi·ri·on

(vī'rē-on)
The complete virus particle that is structurally intact and infectious.

virion

A complete virus particle, as found outside cells, and consisting of the genetic material and the surrounding capsid.

virion

see VIRUS.

virion

elementary virus particle highly resistant to steam sterilization; noted in brain tissue in new-variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

vi·ri·on

(vī'rē-on)
The complete virus particle that is structurally intact and infectious.

virion (vir´ēon, vī´rē-),

n the whole virus, including the inner nucleus and the outer shell.

virion

a complete virus particle, found extracellularly and capable of surviving in metabolically inert form and able to infect other living cells. Minimally viruses are composed of a core of genetic material which may be either RNA or DNA, single- or double-stranded surrounded by a protein coat (capsid) which together constitute a nucleocapsid. Additionally some viruses have a lipoprotein envelope that surrounds the nucleocapsid.
References in periodicals archive ?
During endocytosis of the virion, acidification of the endosome triggers dissociation of the E protein dimers, exposing a hydrophobic peptide (fusion loop) and rearrangement of the E monomers into trimers.
Virion initiates infection by fusion of the viral envelop with plasma membrane following attachment to the cell surface.
A minor structural protein of these viruses is instrumental in guiding the virion on its journey through the insect.
Herpes simplex virus glycoproteins associated with different morphological entities projecting from the virion envelope.
This protein is a cellular cytidine deaminase that is encapsulated into assembling virions in the absence of vif and is inhibitory during the next round of viral replication.
Small-molecule inhibition of HIV-1 replication by specific targeting of the final step of virion maturation.
Vif, which stands for virion infectivity factor, seems to play a vital role when HIV infects such cells.
Because researchers are unsure about how to classify them, various names have been ascribed for them, such as slow virus, virino, viroid, virion and prion, or proteinaceous infectious particle.
Studies on human primary immune responses to dengue infection have identified critical attachment sites on the virion for neutralizing antibodies (4).
The topics include flavivirus virion structure, structure and function of the flavivirus NS5 protein, host responses during mild and severe dengue, flavivirus antiviral development, and vectors of flaviviruses and strategies for control.