viral culture


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viral culture

A test in which a specimen–eg, throat swab, sputum, stool, CSF, urine, from a Pt is placed in live cells; various viruses–eg, adenovirus, enterovirus, herpes simplex, measles, mumps, myxovirus, paramyxovirus, rhinovirus, rubella, varicella-zoster, etc can be cultured from clinical specimens, but are not routinely performed as effective therapies are limited. See Shell vial assay.
References in periodicals archive ?
To achieve this goal, AbCellera and its partners will develop and integrate innovative technologies for viral culture and production, rapid human antibody discovery, protein engineering, and delivery of nucleic acid-encoded antibodies as prophylactic protection against viral infection.
In many cases, the complexity of viral culture overall has resulted in hospitals moving this testing to reference laboratories.
A component of the influenza surveillance conducted by the New York State Department of Health includes the molecular testing and viral culture of respiratory samples submitted by sentinel physicians to the Wadsworth Center Virology Laboratory (Albany, NY, USA).
Because the classical viral culture usually requires several days, cytologic methods such as the Tzanck test are used to support the clinical diagnosis in an early stage, although the Tzanck test cannot distinguish between VZV and HSV infections.
Informed consent was obtained from the parents for perilymph liquid sampling for viral culture and detection of CMV DNA.
Influenza infection was diagnosed using ICD-9 codes with concomitant use of antiviral agents, and was not further confirmed based on the results of viral culture with throat swab," they added.
For direct HSV detection, available tests include antigen detection by direct immunofluorescence, nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) for viral DNA detection, and viral culture (29).
About 585 prospective nasal swab specimens were evaluated with Alere i and compared to viral culture.
The proposal would increase performance requirements for RIDTs to attain at least a sensitivity of 90% for influenza A and 80% for influenza B versus viral culture and/or 80% versus polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods.
Laboratory tests to detect HAdV in conjunctival specimens, such as viral culture or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, are not routinely used in clinics.
A definitive diagnosis requires detection of the virus in the lesion by electron microscopy, viral culture, histopathological examination of the biopsy material, immunofluorescence antibody tests or other serological examinations.