video microscopy


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video microscopy

The use of movie-making techniques, such as time-lapse photography, to obtain highly magnified microscopic images of tissues, thereby allowing observation of cellular processes as they occur.
See also: microscopy
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Video microscopy of sperm swimming in jelly of Xenopus laevis eggs and in Fl were obtained as described in Reinhart et al.
The biggest problem in a video microscopy system is the lack of a high-resolution "The performance of color cameras and even color monitors has leapt ahead of that for hardcopy printers," says Nikon's Shuett.
To begin this work, we have used time-lapse video microscopy to record the development of in vitro-fertilized squid embryos, Loligo pealeii, from early cleavage through the formation of the external yolk syncytial layer (YSL) and the early phase of epiboly.
Vesicle transport on actin filaments was monitored for 60 min by video microscopy, and images of the actin filaments on the coverslip surface were recorded at regular intervals by epi-fluorescence microscopy.
Video microscopy showed that individual cells moved within strands for distances of 30 [[micro]meter] or more at a rate of 2.
Appendix III in Video Microscopy, Plenum Press, New York.
Finally, bright field video microscopy has high temporal resolution (30 frames/s video rate) for quantifying rates of action of gossypol on sperm.
In addition, the primary gravity response, fixing the polarity of nuclear migration and rhizoid growth, occurs in a relatively synchronized population of cells relatively soon after light-induced initiation of germination, and it can be visualized easily through the clear spore coat of Ceratopteris with video microscopy equipment already developed and used in previous shuttle experiments (STL-B).
1D), long microtubule bundles and individual microtubules lie parallel to each other, indicating that the procedure does not significantly perturb their original organization, as defined by fluorescence (1) and video microscopy (4).
2+] events are seen as bright observable blobs (BOBs; defined in 13-15) when viewed with a photon-counting video camera and video microscopy techniques (e.
Alternatively, for video microscopy, the dissociated tissue was briefly pelleted at 1000 x g for 15 s to remove spicule debris, and the top of the pellet was pipetted onto a coated coverslip in a dish of seawater.