vibration


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Related to vibration: Mechanical vibration

vibration

 [vi-bra´shun]
1. a rapid movement to and fro; oscillation.
2. the shaking of the body as a therapeutic measure.
3. a form of massage.
4. a technique of chest physical therapy whereby pressure and a shaking movement of the hand are applied to various segments of the lungs to mobilize secretions.

vi·bra·tion

(vī-brā'shŭn),
1. A shaking.
2. A to-and-fro movement, as in oscillation.
[L. vibratio, fr. vibro, pp. -atus, to quiver, shake]

vibration

/vi·bra·tion/ (vi-bra´shun)
1. a rapid movement to and fro.
2. massage with a light, rhythmic, quivering motion; often performed with a mechanical device (electrovibratory massage).

vibration

[vībrā′shən]
Etymology: L, vibrare, to vibrate
a type of massage administered by quickly tapping with the fingertips or alternating the fingers in a rhythmic manner or by a mechanical device. See also massage.

vibration

Massage
A “soft tissue” technique used in massage therapy that uses vibrating movements, usually delivered by an electrical device.

vibration

Vox populi Jittering, oscillation, grinding

vi·bra·tion

(vī-brā'shŭn)
A group of movements in massage that involve fine or coarse rhythmic shaking of various structures, with or without compression or traction.
[L. vibratio, fr. vibro, pp. -atus, to quiver, shake]

Vibration

The purpose of vibration is to help break up lung secretions. Vibration can be either mechanical or manual. It is performed as the patient breathes deeply. When done manually, the person performing the vibration places his or her hands against the patient's chest and creates vibrations by quickly contracting and relaxing arm and shoulder muscles while the patient exhales. The procedure is repeated several times each day for about five exhalations.

vibration,

n massage technique believed to enhance nerve function by using small superficial rapid movements of the fingertips or palm.

vibration

1. a rapid movement to and fro; oscillation.
2. the shaking of the body as a therapeutic measure.
3. a form of massage.
References in periodicals archive ?
The propagation of traffic-induced vibration from the source depends on the distance from the receiver, frequency of vibration, topography between the source and the receiver, and on the soil and other geotechnical characteristics of the ground.
Many studies have contributed much to the understanding and prediction of the subjective human body response to vibration [3].
Without effective monitoring and if left unchecked, vibration itself leads to a rapid acceleration of wear and possible safety issues.
These waves are interpreted by a codec that converts them into analog vibration signals that would then pass through an amplifier.
One main advantage of vibration for larger diameter drilling is the reduction of forces and moments acting on the drill bit.
Owing to the above stated reasons, vibration monitoring is an integral feature of the machine condition monitoring program.
Vibrations have not traditionally been recognized as major health and safety hazards in workplaces, but Laurentian University's Tammy Eger and her colleagues hope to change that perception.
The first vibration mode of cantilever is characterized by maximum amplitudes of free end vibrations.
Shao and Ma,2007) investigated free vibration analysis of laminated cylindrical shells with arbitrary classical end conditions.
On the other hand, this low frequency vibration methodology can serve as an additional tool for increasing oil recovery [18-20], in conjunction with application of chemical flooding.
Hsu with the Den Hartog Society Award for his lifetime contributions to vibration education and nonlinear vibration research.
During vibration, the transference of energy occurs from the vibration source to the whole body or body part, which causes reactive forces within the body.