vibrating


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vibrating

vibrating,

v using quivering hand motions made across the client's body for therapeutic purposes.
References in periodicals archive ?
MAX Series Vibrating Screens were designed with operator safety in mind.
2 They are located in close proximity to the vibrating line and are always in the soft palate mucosa.
The capsule, which houses a small engine inside, is programmed to begin vibrating six to eight hours after swallowing.
Creators of the vibrating smartpen Falk and Mandy Wolsky reveal on their website they were inspired by their son's early writing attemps.
In addition, the independently vibrating wire technology increases product throughput by up to 40% over traditional woven wire and polyurethane or rubber panels.
The sensors include a vibrating motor and these can be set to vibrate to indicate when someone moves outside a desirable range.
This ultra-low profile is achieved by combining the more traditional C-shape magnetic circuit of larger vibrating motors with miniature moulded neodymium magnets, and makes it ideal for hand-held haptic feedback applications.
The vibrating transporters with one unbalanced mass with kinematic chain are characterized by the fact that it is only one working part that has a vibrating motion and the carry-forward is done by a mechanism with a well known act function.
The theory holds that nature's particles and forces are indeed manifestations of one underlying thing: "strings," which are infinitesimal strands of vibrating energy.
Aircraft crews have reported their M230 machine guns are vibrating too much when the gun is moved or fired.
There are some very simple track and portable plants, and there are also some more sophisticated systems, offering a variety of product and layout choices from jaw and impact crushers to vibrating screens to complex multi-circuit systems.
The mechanical noise created by vibrating insoles could help stroke survivors and people with diabetes-related nerve damage improve their balance, according to a study in the January Annals of Neurology.