vetting


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vetting

The process of thoroughly investigating—e.g., by checking background with police, prior employers, medical school, etc.—a candidate applying for a position in which trustworthiness and reliability are critically important to the position/job.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is less the amount he was worth when he appeared to be vetted in 2015 by the vetting panel.
The Police Federation, which represents rank and file officers, said it was disappointed to see such huge backlogs in vetting.
Steve Smart, Vice-President, Space, Defence and National Security, CGI in the UK noted: Security vetting is a fundamental enabler that underpins the integrity of the UK government.
He said all new staff were vetted and that he hoped all force staff will have the correct vetting carried out "at some stage".
Even now I would anticipate that there are hundreds of people who haven't got the right level of vetting.
People have been removed from their posts because they have refused to undergo vetting and people have not been given jobs because they refused vetting.
He said electronic systems and a vetting register were nowinplace, with all newstaff nowvetted.
Even now I would anticipate there are hundreds of people who haven't got the right level of vetting," he said.
Assistant Chief Constable Nick Croft said: "The ACPO Vetting Policy is a relatively new requirement for the police.
It is the mandate of Parliament to vet nominees forwarded by the President and that is what exactly we will do,' majority leader Aden Duale said when Nasa threatened to boycott vetting process of CSs.
According to majority leader Aden Duale, who is also a member, the committee is tasked with vetting CS nominees sent to the speaker in a accordance with article 152(2) of the constitution and the Public Appointments (Parliamentary Approval) Act.
Section 7 of the Act gives the committee the areas on which to base the vetting.