vetting


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vetting

The process of thoroughly investigating—e.g., by checking background with police, prior employers, medical school, etc.—a candidate applying for a position in which trustworthiness and reliability are critically important to the position/job.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said all new staff were vetted and that he hoped all force staff will have the correct vetting carried out "at some stage".
Even now I would anticipate that there are hundreds of people who haven't got the right level of vetting.
People have been removed from their posts because they have refused to undergo vetting and people have not been given jobs because they refused vetting.
Mr Jenkins said the purpose of vetting was to confirm someone's identity, to check their background, where they live, if they have any convictions and to look into their integrity.
The force's Assistant Chief Constable Nick Croft said the new vetting policy, introduced by the Association of Chief Police Officers, was a "relatively new" requirement.
He said electronic systems and a vetting register were nowinplace, with all newstaff nowvetted.
Even now I would anticipate there are hundreds of people who haven't got the right level of vetting," he said.
Assistant Chief Constable Nick Croft said: "The ACPO Vetting Policy is a relatively new requirement for the police.
We are consistently updating our records with the most critical departments in terms of public-protection undergoing the latest vetting requirements first.
Smaller police forces in particular found it difficult to cope with the levels of vetting required, it found.