veterinary


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veterinary

 [vet´er-ĭ-nar″e]
1. pertaining to domestic animals and their diseases.
veterinary technician a health care worker who is skilled in technical aspects of veterinary medicine and works as a professional assistant to a veterinarian or to any of various types of researchers and scientists.

vet·er·i·nar·y

(vet'ĕr-i-nār-ē),
Relating to the preventive health and disease managements of animals, also encompassing meat hygiene, zoonoses, and epidemiology.
[L. veterinarius, fr. veterina, beast of burden]

veterinary

/vet·er·i·nary/ (vet´er-ĭ-nar″e)
1. pertaining to domestic animals and their diseases.

veterinary

(vĕt′ər-ə-nĕr′ē, vĕt′rə-)
adj.
Of or relating to veterinary medicine; concerned or connected with the medical or surgical treatment of animals, especially domestic animals.
n. pl. veterinar·ies
A veterinarian.

vet·er·i·nar·y

(vet'ĕr-in-ar-ē)
Relating to the diseases of animals.
[L. veterinarius, fr. veterina, beast of burden]

veterinary

1. pertaining to domestic animals and their diseases.
2. vernacular for veterinarian.

veterinary assistant
1. a veterinarian employed in a practice on a salary.
2. paraveterinary personnel with a variety of trainings including veterinary nurses, laboratory technicians, laboratory animal technicians, animal attendants. Usually with a minimum of 2 years' full-time training or its equivalent.
veterinary Board
in countries with government services modeled on the British system is the registering authority for veterinarians who wish to conduct a practice.
veterinary certificate
a certificate by a veterinarian relating to matters within the scope of veterinary medicine. Include certificates of soundness, more commonly these days a presale certificate, of freedom of products from diseased tissue, of vaccination or surgical alteration.
veterinary clinic
1. the title indicates that the establishment has the necessary facilities for the examination and treatment of animals but not necessarily ward accommodation and 24 hour surveillance.
2. the study of disease by direct examination of the living patient.
veterinary degree
awarded by a university at the completion of a degree course in veterinary science and accepted in many countries as sufficient evidence of competence to practice, in others as sufficient to entitle the person to sit for the qualifying or board examination. The important degree, and the one on which registration to practice is based, is the first or primary degree. A postgraduate degree has no relevance to the registration procedure.
veterinary dermatology
the study of the diseases of the skin of animals.
veterinary drugs
medicines used in the treatment of animals. It is an important point in law that medicines used to treat animals should be registered by the relevant local authority, e.g. the Food and Drug Administration, for use in animals. The use of unregistered medicines could disadvantage the veterinarian if the outcome of the particular case was unfavorable and the client resorted to law to recoup any losses.
veterinary emergency service
veterinary services provided at the patient's domicile or the veterinarian's premises for sick and injured patients when the emergency arises; the traditional and preponderant form of service provided by veterinarians everywhere.
veterinary facilities
buildings and fixtures used to catch and restrain animals for veterinary examination and treatment. The use of faulty or incorrectly constructed races, chutes, operating tables may put the veterinarian in legal as well as physical jeopardy unless he/she warns the client beforehand that risk is involved.
veterinary farm visits
veterinary services provided to patients on their home farm, the traditional and preponderant form of veterinary service to farm livestock.
veterinary hospital
the title indicates that the establishment has all of the facilities available including surgery, radiology, clinical pathology, dispensary and ward accommodation and provision for 24 hour surveillance of patients.
veterinary internal medicine
the study of the diseases of the internal organs of animals.
veterinary investigation centers
the system in the UK of regional veterinary laboratories dedicated to the study and diagnosis of the diseases of animals in the region.
veterinary license
the license to practice awarded by the country's registering authority on the basis of the applicant's university degree. Usually awarded annually to provide an opportunity for a periodic review of the candidate's capability.
veterinary medical education
includes undergraduate courses at universities, postgraduate courses either degree or diploma courses at universities or continuing professional education courses run by professional organizations such as associations and colleges.
veterinary nurse
see animal nurses. Called also VN.
veterinary pharmacology
the study of medicines used in the treatment of animals.
veterinary pharmacology industry
the private companies and corporations which operate for the purpose of developing, manufacturing and selling medicines for use in animals. In some countries all of this work is done by government corporations and commissions rather than privately owned organizations.
veterinary physician
a veterinarian who practices medicine as distinct from surgery; one who deals with medical diseases and not surgical diseases. This is not a common form of practice amongst veterinarians.
veterinary practice
veterinary practitioner
1. a registered veterinarian in practice on his/her own account and earning income as fees for service rendered, or a veterinarian employed by another veterinarian who is so employed.
2. in the UK refers to veterinarians on the supplementary register of the RCVS.
veterinary profession
all of the veterinarians. Usually qualified in terms of area, e.g. country or international. See also profession (2).
veterinary science
the study of the diseases and health maintenance of animals. This can only be a generalization because veterinary science is really what veterinarians do and are trained to do as well as it can be done. In some countries this includes what in other countries is classified as animal husbandry, especially the nutrition and breeding of farm animals and in the context of production efficiency unrelated to the health of the animals.
veterinary services
includes veterinary practice, further subdivided into primary accession, consultant or specialist, advisory, contract, species specialist, government veterinary services in a preventive veterinary context, trouble-shooting services to back up services such as artificial insemination, drug and feed sales and domiciliary or house-call practice.
veterinary specialists
veterinarians who provide services to other veterinarians in special areas, e.g. surgery, ophthalmology, radiology, anesthesiology, pathology, theriogenology and internal medicine, and at a higher level of expertise than the general practitioner could attempt to provide.
veterinary State Board
set up under the registering Act to administer it. The constitution varies from elected veterinarians to veterinarians appointed by government, to a mixture of appointed and elected veterinarians and nonveterinarians. The function of the Board is to ensure that the level of veterinary professional service to the community is at the level that the public desires and the government authorizes.
veterinary surgeon
1. any qualified veterinarian.
2. a veterinarian providing specialist surgical services to other veterinarians.
veterinary Surgeon's Act
legislation to empower a Veterinary Board to regulate the provision of veterinary services to the community.
veterinary surgery
the study of the surgical diseases (those dealt with principally by surgical means) of animals.
veterinary technicians
see veterinary assistant (above). A term used commonly in the USA.
veterinary toxicology
the study of the poisons and poisonings affecting animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many veterinary nurses are employed in general veterinary practices, but you could also find work in research establishments, laboratories, universities, colleges, zoological/wildlife parks, charities, pharmaceutical companies and breeding/boarding kennels.
AAHA is the only organization that accredits animal hospitals throughout the United States and Canada; currently, more than 3,200 veterinary clinics hold the "AAHA-accredited" designation.
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The loss of information on the history of veterinary advertising has occurred as it has in other subject disciplines [10].
Scott Weese, Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1, Canada; email: jsweese@uoguelph.
Pierce's 33-year-old veterinary program graduates about 15 students a year and is one of few such programs in the state that offers students experience on campus with large animals such as cows, sheep and pigs.
Minneapolis-based Colle + McVoy's first step was to conduct in-depth interviews--face-to-face and via phone--with veterinary professionals across the country.
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If you really do love animals and can cope with hard work over odd hours then veterinary nursing offers a very satisfying career," explained Jennifer.

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