vestige


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vestige

 [ves´tij]
the remnant of a structure that functioned in a previous stage of species or individual development. adj., adj vestig´ial.

ves·tige

(ves'tij), [TA]
A trace or a rudimentary structure; the degenerated remains of any structure which occurs as an entity in the embryo or fetus.
Synonym(s): vestigium [TA]
[L. vestigium]

vestige

/ves·tige/ (ves´tij) the remnant of a structure that functioned in a previous stage of species or individual development.vestig´ial

vestige

(vĕs′tĭj)
n.
1. A visible trace, evidence, or sign of something that once existed but exists or appears no more: a building that is the area's last vestige of its colonial era.
2. Biology A rudimentary or degenerate, usually nonfunctioning, structure that is the remnant of an organ or part that was fully developed or functioning in a preceding generation or an earlier stage of development.

vestige

[ves′tij]
Etymology: L, vestigium, trace
an imperfectly developed, relatively useless organ or other structure of the body that had a vital function at an earlier stage of life or in a more primitive form of life. The vermiform appendix is a vestigial organ. vestigial, adj.

ves·tige

(ves'tij) [TA]
A trace or a rudimentary structure; the degenerated remains of any structure that occurs as an entity in the embryo or fetus.
[L. vestigium]

vestige

A body structure with no current apparent function which appears to have had a function at a previous evolutionary stage.

vestige (vesˑ·tij),

n an organ that has developed imperfectly and is largely considered nonfunctional. It may have provided a significant function in a more primordial type of life or during an earlier life stage. The vermiform appendix in humans is an example of a vestige.

vestige

the remnant of a structure that functioned in a previous stage of species or individual development.
References in classic literature ?
The mention of Levin's name seemed to deprive Kitty of the last vestige of self-control.
I shall content myself with barely observing here, that of all the confederacies of antiquity, which history has handed down to us, the Lycian and Achaean leagues, as far as there remain vestiges of them, appear to have been most free from the fetters of that mistaken principle, and were accordingly those which have best deserved, and have most liberally received, the applauding suffrages of political writers.
It was volcanic in origin, and was now fringed on three sides by coral reefs; some fumaroles to the northward, and a hot spring, were the only vestiges of the forces that had long since originated it.
The curate, I found, was quite incapable of dis- cussion; this new and culminating atrocity had robbed him of all vestiges of reason or forethought.
Down their slopes were the red pathways of the slides, those avalanches of earth, stones and trees, which descend into the hollows, leaving vestiges of their track hardly to be effaced by the vegetation of ages.
You behold another phase of his passion, a fury bejewelled with stars, mayhap bearing the crescent of the moon on its brow, shaking the last vestiges of its torn cloud-mantle in inky-black squalls, with hail and sleet descending like showers of crystals and pearls, bounding off the spars, drumming on the sails, pattering on the oilskin coats, whitening the decks of homeward-bound ships.
There appears to be a tendency to extinction among all the savage nations; and this tendency would seem to have been in operation among the aboriginals of this country long before the advent of the white men, if we may judge from the traces and traditions of ancient populousness in regions which were silent and deserted at the time of the discovery; and from the mysterious and perplexing vestiges of unknown races, predecessors of those found in actual possession, and who must long since have become gradually extinguished or been destroyed.
In many instances nothing marked the spot where lay the vestiges of some poor mortal--who, leaving "a large circle of sorrowing friends," had been left by them in turn-- except a depression in the earth, more lasting than that in the spirits of the mourners.
Vestige is hard to place in a single, well-defined category, but one point should be made clear: this is one of the best fine-dining restaurants in the state.
The author traces the critical geological periods during which life emerged, examining each period's fossil record for clues to the evolution of certain body plans, He explains how dinosaur metabolism, form, and reproduction were uniquely suited for this period in Earth's history, Ward asserts that modern bird flight is a vestige of the dinosaurs' respiratory system becoming adapted to low-oxygen air.
Standard single-drop nozzles in three styles: Type-1 nozzles used where gate vestige is critical to appearance, or to minimize stringing or drooling; Type-2 nozzles for viscous materials when gate vestige is not critical, or when gating into a runner; and Type-3 valve gate nozzles for highly cosmetic gates, or when higher flow rates are needed.
Genzken navigates the moment by adhering to some vestige of discrete sculpture, which, paradoxically if only momentarily, can stymie the optical glut of capital.