vestibular nuclei


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ves·tib·u·lar nu·cle·i

[TA]
a group of four main nuclei, which are located in the lateral region of the hindbrain beneath the floor of the rhomboid fossa. These nuclei are the inferior vestibular nucleus, medial vestibular nucleus (Schwalbe nucleus), lateral vestibular nucleus (Deiter nucleus), and superior vestibular nucleus (Bechterew nucleus). The inferior nucleus contains a group of large cells, the magnocellular part of inferior vestibular nucleus [TA] or cell group F [TAalt] (pars magnocellularis nuclei vestibularis inferioris [TA]), located caudally in the nucleus. A group of medium-sized neurons is located in lateral portions of the lateral nucleus, the parvocellular part [TA] or cell group I [TAalt] (pars parvocellularis [TA]). These nuclei receive primary fibers of the vestibular nerve, are reciprocally connected with the flocculonodular lobe of the cerebellum, and project by way of the medial longitudinal fasciculus to the abducens, trochlear, and oculomotor nuclei and to the ventral horn of the spinal cord. The lateral vestibular nucleus projects to the ipsilateral ventral horn of the spinal cord by the vestibulospinal tract.
Synonym(s): nuclei vestibulares [TA]

ves·tib·u·lar nu·cle·i

(ves-tib'yū-lăr nū'klē-ī) [TA]
A group of four main nuclei that are located in the lateral region of the hindbrain beneath the floor of the rhomboid fossa. These nuclei are the inferior vestibular nucleus, medial vestibular nucleus (Schwalbe nucleus), lateral vestibular nucleus (Deiter nucleus), and superior vestibular nucleus (Bechterew nucleus). The inferior nucleus contains a group of large cells, the magnocellular part of inferior vestibular nucleus or cell group F (pars magnocellularis nuclei vestibularis inferioris [TA]), located caudally in the nucleus. A group of medium-sized neurons is located in lateral portions of the lateral nucleus, the parvocellular part or cell group I (pars parvocellularis [TA]). These nuclei receive primary fibers of the vestibular nerve, are reciprocally connected with the flocculonodular lobe of the cerebellum, and project by way of the medial longitudinal fasciculus to the abducens, trochlear, and oculomotor nuclei and to the ventral horn of the spinal cord. The lateral vestibular nucleus projects to the ipsilateral ventral horn of the spinal cord by the vestibulospinal tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
Serotonin also regulates neural activity in the central nucleus of the amygdala, which is reciprocally connected to the central vestibular nuclei and autonomic centers in the brainstem [17].
Surface electrodes placed on the paravertebral nuchal muscles opposite the impaired vestibular side facilitated the contralateral impaired vestibular nuclei by the crossed spinal vestibular pathway.
They connect via the vestibular nerves to vestibular nuclei in the brainstem, attached to the front of the spinal cord.
It has been proposed that the reciprocal connections between brainstem vestibular nuclei and the structures that modulate trigeminal nociceptive inputs may underlie the pathophysiology of VM.
Both vestibular and auditory stimuli are sent to the brain via the eighth cranial nerve (vestibulocochlear nerve), and then processed in vestibular nuclei in the brainstem and cerebellum.
18-20) For instance, the vestibular nuclei occupy a prominent position in the brainstem.
Nystagmus and vertigo result from involvement of vestibular nuclei.
The vestibular nuclei have important connections to various regions in the brain, but three of the most important are to the ocular nuclei, cerebellum and spinal tracts.
Reflecting this need for multisensory integration, the vestibular and balance system is multimodal even at the level of vestibular nuclei.
Thus, the vestibulocerebellum involves interactions between the vestibular nuclei and the flocculonodular lobe, the spinocerebellum involves connections between the anterior and posterior parts of the vermis and the spinal cord and the cerebrocerebellum implies connections between the cerebellar hemispheres and the cerebral cortex.
Earlier research suggested that this spacing effect is the product of the transfer of the memory trace from the flocculus, a cerebellar cortex region that connects to motor nuclei involved in eye movement, to another brain region known as the vestibular nuclei.
Earlier research suggested that this spacing effect is the product of the transfer of the memory trace from the flocculus, a cerebellar cortex region which connects to motor nuclei involved in eye movement, to another brain region known as the vestibular nuclei.

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