vertebral artery


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ver·te·bral ar·ter·y

[TA]
the first branch of the subclavian artery; for descriptive purposes, divided into four parts, designated V1 to V4: 1) prevertebral part, the portion before it enters the foramen of the transverse process of the sixth cervical vertebra; 2) cervical part, the portion in the transverse foramina of the first six cervical vertebrae; 3) atlantic (suboccipital) part, the portion running along the posterior arch of the atlas; and 4) intracranial part, the portion within the cranial cavity to its union with the artery from the other side to form the basilar artery.
Synonym(s): arteria vertebralis [TA]

vertebral artery

one of a pair of arteries branching from the subclavian arteries, arising deep in the neck from the cranial and dorsal subclavian surfaces. Each vertebral artery divides into two cervical and five cranial branches, supplying deep neck muscles, the spinal cord and spinal membranes, and the cerebellum.

ver·te·bral ar·te·ry

(vĕr'tĕ-brăl ahr'tĕr-ē) [TA]
The first branch of the subclavian artery; for descriptive purposes, divided into four parts: 1) prevertebral part, the portion before it enters the foramen of the transverse process of the sixth cervical vertebra; 2) transversarial part, the portion in the transverse foramina of the first six cervical vertebrae; 3) suboccipital (atlantic) part, the portion running along the posterior arch of the atlas; and 4) intracranial part, the portion within the cranial cavity to its union with the artery from the other side to form the basilar artery.
Synonym(s): arteria vertebralis [TA] .

vertebral artery

Abbreviation: VA
The first branch of the subclavian artery; it runs up the back of the neck via foramina in the transverse processes of the cervical vertebrae and enters the cranial cavity through the foramen magnum. The right and left vertebral arteries merge along the ventral surface of the hindbrain to become the basilar artery. Branches of the vertebral artery include the anterior and posterior spinal arteries and the posterior inferior cerebellar artery.

The vertebral arteries carry about 20% of the brain's blood supply, feeding the brainstem, cerebellum, and most of the posterior cerebral hemispheres. Blockages of the vertebral circulation, e.g., an ischemic stroke, can produce problems in vegetative functions, such as consciousness and respiration, and problems of balance, hearing, motor coordination, and visual perception.

See: head (Arteries and veins of the head) and brain (Major arteries of the brain) for illus.; circle of Willis for illus.
See also: artery
References in periodicals archive ?
High patient age, severe disability at admission (mRS score 3-5), presentation of dissection as stroke, and dissection in the intracranial vertebral artery were significantly more frequent in deceased patients with VAD than in surviving patients with VAD (Table 4).
The diagnosis of vertebral artery dissection is usually established by MRI, MRA, or CT angiography (6).
Chestnut (2004) proposes that until data are available, the ethical, scientific and logical analysis based on current understanding of risk factors, vertebral artery dissection must be considered a rare, unpredictable event associated with, however not 'caused' by, CSM.
The Durban Metropolitan Vascular Service, with its experience of 17 vertebral artery injuries managed endovascularly (embolisation and covered stent), yielded a technical success rate of 94%.
Vertebral artery stenosis caused by cervical spondylosis: A case report.
This is possible because the circle of Willis receives blood from the basilar artery via the vertebral artery which comes up from the back and is completely independent of the carotids.
Fluoroscopic image of Penumbra 4MAX DDC in position in a small vertebral artery (Photo: Business Wire)
The spinal arteries are supplemented by medullary arteries from the vertebral artery in the cervical region and from intercostal arteries in the thoracic and lumbar region.
Doctors said Hughes died after his vertebral artery split when hit by the ball, leading to massive bleeding in his brain.
Cricket Australia team doctor Peter Brukner said yesterday the 25-year-old suffered an "incredibly rare vertebral artery dissection" caused when an 85mph ball hit his neck.
An MRI confirmed the diagnosis, vertebral artery dissection, and showed that the transient ischemic attack, or mini-stroke, she had experienced as a result had left no lasting brain damage.