verbal abuse


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verbal abuse

Psychology A form of emotional abuse consisting of the use of abusive and demeaning language with a spouse, child, or elder, often by a caregiver or other person in a position of power. See Child abuse, Emotional abuse, Spousal abuse.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our surveys show that life on the frontline of retail can be pretty tough, with more than half suffering verbal abuse in the last twelve months.
There was also a slight increase in the number expelled or suspended for verbal abuse or threatening behaviour against an adult.
A source in the office of the Displacement and Migration in Kirkuk told the National Iraqi News Agency / NINA / that Karhot and during his performance to the university exam in the college of knowledge in Kirkuk was subjected to verbal abuse and beatings by the displaced students from Anbar were performing the exam in the same place.
A member of staff - who is a completely innocent party - took himself to Accident and Emergency after a physical altercation accompanied by sustained and prolonged verbal abuse of an extreme nature.
There are multiple forms of violence at a workplace such as physical assault, sexual harassment, bullying, verbal abuse and even economic and financial abuse," said Ms Mubarak.
However, it sounds as if the verbal abuse is triggered by the alcohol, so that should be the first problem to work on.
Verbal abuse is defined by the study as humiliating a wife in public, demanding that a woman be silent in public, threats of physical abuse, denigrating a woman's personal appearances, using sexually explicit profanities against her, and not speaking her name.
The study highlighted the magnitude, density, scope and complexity of the mosaic of verbal abuse shown in nurse-patient interactions.
Staff-to-staff conflict was the most commonly reported type of verbal abuse, the study shows, but when it comes to physical violence, Alameddine said that patients and their families are the primary instigators.
However, experts said it is difficult to rule out other factors such as poverty and social isolation which are often linked to physical and verbal abuse in childhood and could cause disease later in life.
Both are wide open to verbal abuse and if in doubt one should consider becoming a recluse so they are not offended by their fellow beings' comments.