verbal


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Related to verbal: Verbal reasoning

verbal,

adj by word of oral cavity; oral, as in a verbal agreement.
References in periodicals archive ?
The response class research, briefly reviewed in a later section, suggests that it is more efficient to target Skinner's autoclitics and other verbal operants rather than the linguistic categories.
Saamic languages have no definite conjugation either (see also Kortvely 2005 : 29), however, Mikko Korhonen indicates that a 3PSg/Du/Pl verbal inflection -s (identical with a respective possessive suffix) occurs in them only in the imperative, e.
In contrast, the current study was underpinned by several theoretical approaches that provide insight into the verbal abuse behaviour of doctors and nurses, including: Social Role, Social Identity, and Attribution theories.
Vital terminology to the Verbal Behavior Approach is presented such as: mand, tact, echoic, and intraverbal.
About Beyond Verbal Launched in May 2013, Beyond Verbal Communication is leading a multi-billion dollar market of emotionally enhanced applications and devices.
Data from other areas sometimes do not contribute to a broader understanding of verbal behavior from Skinner's perspective of analysis.
The researchers found that adolescents who had experienced harsh verbal discipline suffered from increased levels of depressive symptoms, and were more likely to demonstrate behavioral problems such as vandalism or antisocial and aggressive behavior.
Exclusive breastfeeding - rather than any level of breastfeeding - had the greatest effect, boosting verbal IQ scores by nearly a point per month.
Campaigners raised concerns that verbal insults - such as name calling and the use of derogatory language - is seen as less serious than other types of bullying, warning that the emotional impact on victims can be just as damaging.
First, it's important to recognize that the advantages of Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior (1957) aren't limited to just those individuals with a diagnosis of autism.
The study said: "Our data indicates that low doses of ecstasy are associated with decreased verbal memory function, which is suggestive for ecstasy-induced neuro-toxicity.
The use of verbal orders should be restricted to times when a practitioner is physically unavailable to respond to a patient care need in an appropriate manner because: