ventriculography


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Related to ventriculography: radionuclide ventriculography

ventriculography

 [ven-trik″u-log´rah-fe]
1. radiography of the cerebral ventricles after introduction of air or other contrast medium. This study is no longer used to examine the brain; being replaced by CT and MRI.
2. radiography of a ventricle of the heart after injection of a contrast medium.
first pass ventriculography first pass radionuclide angiocardiography.
gated blood pool ventriculography equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography.
radionuclide ventriculography radionuclide angiocardiography.

ven·tric·u·log·ra·phy

(ven-trik'yū-log'ră-fē),
1. Radiographic demonstration of the cerebral ventricles by direct injection of air or contrast medium; developed and described by Dandy in 1918. Compare: pneumoencephalography.
2. Demonstration of the contractility of the cardiac ventricles by recording serially the distribution of intravenously injected radionuclide or that of radiographic contrast medium injected through an intracardiac catheter.
[ventriculo- + G. graphē, a writing]

ventriculography

/ven·tric·u·log·ra·phy/ (ven-trik″u-log´rah-fe)
1. radiography of the cerebral ventricles after introduction of air or other contrast medium.
2. radiography of a ventricle of the heart after injection of a contrast medium.

first pass ventriculography  see under angiocardiography.
gated blood pool ventriculography  equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography.
radionuclide ventriculography  see under angiocardiography.

ventriculography

[ventrik′yəlog′rəfē]
Etymology: L, ventriculus + graphein, to record
1 the radiographic examination of a ventricle of the heart after injection of a radiopaque contrast medium.
2 the radiographic examination of the head following cerebrospinal fluid removal from the cerebral ventricles and its replacement by a contrast medium, usually air.

ventriculography

Imaging Imaging of cerebral or cardiac ventricles. See Radionuclide ventriculography.

ven·tric·u·log·ra·phy

(ven-trik'yū-log'ră-fē)
1. Demonstration of the contractility of the cardiac ventricles by serially recording the distribution of intravenously injected radionuclide or that of radiographic contrast medium injected through an intracardiac catheter.
2. Visualization by roentgenography of a cardiac ventricle by injection of radiopaque contrast material.
[ventriculo- + G. graphē, a writing]

ventriculography

1. radiography of the cerebral ventricles after introduction of air or other contrast medium. Called also pneumoventriculogram.
2. radiography of a ventricle of the heart after injection of a contrast medium.
References in periodicals archive ?
All patients underwent coronary angiography and ventriculography before operation using standard techniques.
Alterations in left ventricular function in patients with Behcet's disease using radionuclide ventriculography and Doppler echocardiography.
Left ventriculography demonstrated distal inferior wall akinesis with overall preserved left ventricular (LV) systolic function.
A ventriculography finding a cerebral hernia caused by a right hemispheric temporal tumor.
The diagnostic catheters for coronary angiography and ventriculography.
Concerning the imaging modalities, the AC-PC were used as references for atlas-based targeting, and this AC-PC line was previously identified by ventriculography, which has now been replaced by CT and MRI.
Nevertheless, radionuclide ventriculography is not a practical and easily available test.
Comparison of single and biplane ventriculography for determination of left ventricular volume and ejection fraction.
CM administered intravascularly are considerably diluted before they reach the kidney, and more so upon intravenous administration such as for contrast-enhanced CT than upon intraarterial administration such as for renovasography and left ventriculography.
All our patients underwent left ventriculography and selective coronary angiography.
Also, most angiocardiography patients undergo left ventriculography, during which the peak concentration of contrast in renal arterial blood is much higher, and changes much more rapidly, than when contrast is administered intravenously.