ventilator-associated pneumonia


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ventilator-associated pneumonia

the most common type of nosocomial pneumonia, a frequently fatal type seen in patients breathing with a ventilator. It is usually caused by aspiration of contaminated secretions or stomach contents and may be bacterial, viral, or fungal.

ventilator-associated pneumonia

In patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation, a new and persistent infiltrate seen on chest x-ray associated with fever, elevated or depressed white blood cell counts, and sputum that is either purulent or full of disease-causing bacteria. Synonym: artificial airway-associated pneumonia
See also: pneumonia
References in periodicals archive ?
The Effect of Late-onset Ventilator-associated Pneumonia in Determining Patient Mortality.
Prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia by oral decontamination: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.
METHOD Published reports were reviewed for current evidence on the use of the ventilator bundle to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia, and education sessions were held to present the findings to 61 nurses in coronary care and surgical intensive care units.
2] level of reliability and decreased episodes of ventilator-associated pneumonia (Resar et al.
Inglis et al reported that biofilms have been identified in endotracheal tubes of patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia.
which includes research with 50 infectious diseases specialists and 51 critical care/internists physicians, analyzes the usage and uptake of antibiotics for the treatment of patients diagnosed with CABP and NP, including hospital-acquired pneumonia, healthcare-associated pneumonia, and ventilator-associated pneumonia in the hospital setting.
Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is one of the most common and severe hospital-adquired infections, and multidrugresistant gram-negative bacilli (MDR-GNB) constitute the main etiology in many countries.
It has been suggested that instillation of normal saline in conjunction with endotracheal suctioning may result in dispersion of contaminated adherent material into the lower respiratory tract, with the subsequent increased risk of nosocomial infection such as ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP).
The topics include microbial populations in oral biofilms, bacterial catabolism of salivary substrates, the role of the extracellular polysaccharides matrix in virulent oral biofilms, a holistic view of interspecies bacterial interactions within human dental plaque, biofilms in periodontal health and disease, oral biofilms as a reservoir for extra-oral pathogens: ventilator-associated pneumonia, and probiotics as a possible tool in oral health care.
Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the nosocomial setting.
3) MRSA is the most frequent cause of ventilator-associated pneumonia and the second highest cause of mortality in these critically ill patients.