venous


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vein

 [vān]
a vessel through which blood passes from various organs or parts back to the heart, in the systemic circulation carrying blood that has given up most of its oxygen. Veins, like arteries, have three coats: an inner coat (tunica intima), middle coat (tunica media), and outer coat (tunica externa); however, in veins these are less thick and collapse when the vessel is cut. Many veins, especially superficial ones, have valves formed of reduplication of their lining membrane. See Appendix 2-6 and see also Plates.
afferent v's veins that carry blood to an organ.
allantoic v's paired vessels that accompany the allantois, growing out from the primitive hindgut and entering the body stalk of the early embryo.
cardinal v's embryonic vessels that include the pre- and postcardinal veins and the ducts of Cuvier (common cardinal veins).
emissary vein one passing through a foramen of the skull and draining blood from a cerebral sinus into a vessel outside the skull. See anatomic Table of Veins in the Appendices.
postcardinal v's paired vessels in the early embryo that return blood from regions caudal to the heart.
precardinal v's paired venous trunks in the embryo cranial to the heart.
pulp v's vessels draining the venous sinuses of the spleen.
subcardinal v's paired vessels in the embryo, replacing the postcardinal veins and persisting to some degree as definitive vessels.
sublobular v's tributaries of the hepatic veins that receive the central veins of hepatic lobules.
supracardinal v's paired vessels in the embryo developing later than the subcardinal veins and persisting chiefly as the lower segment of the inferior vena cava.
thebesian v's smallest cardiac veins; see anatomic Table of Veins in the Appendices.
trabecular v's vessels coursing in splenic trabeculae, formed by tributary pulp veins.
varicose v's see varicose veins.
vitelline v's veins that return the blood from the yolk sac to the primitive heart of the early embryo.

ve·nous

(vē'nŭs),
Relating to a vein or to the veins.
Synonym(s): phleboid (2)
[L. venosus]

venous

/ve·nous/ (ve´nus) pertaining to the veins.

venous

(vē′nəs)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the veins in the body: venous circulation.
2. Of, relating to, or being the blood in the veins or pulmonary arteries that is usually dark red as a result of low oxygen content.
3. Having numerous veins, as a leaf or the wings of an insect.

ve′nous·ly adv.
ve′nous·ness n.

venous

See vein.

ve·nous

(vē'nŭs)
Relating to a vein or to the veins.
[L. venosus]

venous

pertaining to a vein or veins.

ve·nous

(vē'nŭs)
Relating to a vein or veins.
[L. venosus]

venous

pertaining to the veins.

venous dilatation
persistent dilatation of the vein but without necessarily any weakening of the wall or varicosity.
hepatic portal venous system
includes the veins from the alimentary tract, the portal vein, the sinusoids in the liver, the hepatic veins and then the entry into the caudal vena cava.
venous infarct
see venous infarct.
obstructed venous drainage
may be generalized or local; manifested by dilation, local edema.
orbital venous plexus
a plexus for venous drainage from the ophthalmic veins at the apex of the orbit; drains into the cavernous venous sinus within the cranium.
venous return
the flow of blood into the heart from the peripheral vessels.
venous return curves
relate venous return to atrial pressure; the inverse of the Starling relationship; an increase in atrial pressure decreases the venous return.
scleral venous plexus
a ring of small vessels around the corneal limbus which forms a link in the chain of vessels which drain the aqueous humor. Called also canal of Schlemm.
venous sinuses
see venous sinus.
venous system
the bodily system of veins commencing with the venae cavae, thence through the large veins and their tributaries, and immediately subsequent to the capillaries, the venules.
venous thrombosis
the presence of a thrombus in a vein. Originates in phlebitis in most cases. It is a major problem in horses because of the high incidence of jugular phlebitis and periphlebitis as a result of injection of irritating materials. See also caudal vena caval thrombosis.

Patient discussion about venous

Q. How can I prevent blood clots? I am 45 years old and am supposed to go on a business trip overseas. The flight itself is 12 hours long and then I have to continue traveling by bus. Could this cause me to have blood clots? If so, how can I prevent it?

A. Always walk as much as you can on the plane. Also, rotate your ankels in circles. Sometimes try to use your ankels and make the alphabet with them. Have fun..

More discussions about venous
References in periodicals archive ?
We present two case reports of central venous stenosis, one of right subclavian vein and the other left innominate vein.
Venous and diabetic leg ulcer healing rates were significantly better at 4, 8, and 12 weeks in the 30 timolol-treated patients than in the 30 patients who received conventional treatment alone, noted Bindhiya Thomas, MS, and colleagues at the Government Medical College, Kottayam, Kerala, India.
She had a history of chronic kidney disease and haemodialysis with a tunnelled central venous catheter (CVC) for 18 years.
Deep venous thrombosis is typically seen as an illness and complication of the surgically ill.
US patent number 9,289,577 B2, "Occlusion Access System," covers a method for providing access to a central venous system of a patient.
2) Venous infarcts occur due to obstruction of the venous system by thrombus or external compression.
Conrad Jobst dedicated his life and expertise to the development of gradient compression garments to better relieve the symptoms of venous disease.
It has been reported that leg ulcers related to venous insufficiency constitute 70%, arterial disease 10%, and those of mixed etiology 15% of presentations.
However, there are no studies indicating whether these venous PT anomalies and variants are multiple or single, which could significantly impact the prognosis of venous PT patients.
An even greater socio-economic impact is seen with more advanced venous disease.
As a family physician certified by the American Board of Venous and Lymphatic Disease, I would like to point out a couple of things.
Microscopically, it showed a dilated intact venous wall with marked reduction of smooth muscle cells in the media.