venom


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venom

 [ven´om]
poison, especially a toxic substance normally secreted by a serpent, insect, or other animal.
Russell's viper venom the venom of Vipera russelli (Russell's viper), which acts in vitro as an intrinsic thromboplastin and is useful in defining deficiencies of coagulation factor X.

ven·om

(ven'ŏm),
A poisonous fluid secreted by snakes, spiders, scorpions, etc.
[M. Eng. and O. Fr. venim, fr. L. venenum, poison]

venom

/ven·om/ (ven´om) a poison, especially one normally secreted by a serpent, insect, or other animal.

venom

(vĕn′əm)
n.
A poisonous secretion of an animal, such as a snake, spider, or scorpion, usually transmitted to prey or to attackers by a bite or sting.

venom

[ven′əm]
Etymology: L, venenum, poison
a toxic fluid substance secreted by some snakes, arthropods, and other animals and transmitted by their stings or bites.

venom

Toxicology A poisonous substance produced by an insect or animal, stored in specific sacs and sundry sites, and released by biting or stinging; venoms, the original biological weapons, are used for defense and to capture prey. See Snake venom, Yellow jacket venom.

ven·om

(ven'ŏm)
A toxin secreted by snakes, spiders, scorpions, and other cold-blooded animals.
[M. Eng. and O. Fr. venim, fr. L. venenum, poison]

venom

Poison produced by scorpions, some jellyfish, some fish, a few snakes, some toads, the Gila monster, some spiders and a few insects such as bees, wasps or hornets. Venoms act in various ways and may affect either the nervous system, to cause paralysis, or the blood to cause either widespread clotting or bleeding. Venoms are seldom fatal except in very young or debilitated people.

Venom

A poisonous substance secreted by an animal, usually delivered through a bite or a sting.

venom

poison, especially a toxic substance normally secreted by a serpent, insect or other animal.

Russell's viper venom
the venom of the Russell viper (Vipera russelli), which acts in vitro as an intrinsic thromboplastin and is useful in defining deficiencies of clotting factor X. See also russell's viper venom.
References in periodicals archive ?
We only plan to produce a handful of Venom GTs in 2016 as we are also preparing for our next evolution, the Venom F5.
Early in his career, he discovered details of fire salamander venom by tickling a new specimen with a piece of grass.
Besides 88% water, bee venom consists of at least 18 pharmacologically active components including a variety of peptides [melittin, apamin, adolapin, and mast cell deregulating (MCD) peptide], enzymes (phospholipase A2 and hyaluronidase), bioactive amines (histamine and epinephrine), and other non-peptide components (lipids, carbohydrates and free amino acids), minerals and volatiles (Tu et al.
Kristine Schmalenberg of Johnson & Johnson maintains that bee venom has really risen to the top of the list of new efficacious skin care ingredients.
Scorpion venom has the ability to identify pain receptors in humans.
Add Ons : All VENOM products, including "safety," "lifestyle" and "sports" models have the ability to add an rx clip to cater to those who need prescription eyewear.
The lipid knocks off its own head by making a ring within itself, prompted by the protein from the spider venom.
We put the bees in reverse tweezers and leave them alone for about 15 minutes--giving it time for the venom to get pumped into the sting.
The facial uses the magical ingredient, bee venom, which is believed to trick the surface of the skin that it has been stung.
The Venom mounts by removing the existing cylinder pin and installing the LaserLyte integrated laser and cylinder pin configuration.
According to court papers, Biancone's suit cites Strawbridge's address to the Thoroughbred Club of America in Lexington on October 31 where Strawbridge said: "We all know the story of a trainer caught with enough snake venom to poison a small country and he is still training in the US.