varix


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varix

 [vār´iks] (L.)
an enlarged, tortuous vein, artery, or lymphatic vessel.
aneurysmal varix a markedly dilated tortuous vessel; sometimes used to denote a form of arteriovenous aneurysm in which the blood flows directly into a neighboring vein without the intervention of a connecting sac.
arterial varix a racemose aneurysm or varicose artery.
esophageal varices varicosities of branches of the azygous vein which anastomose with tributaries of the portal vein in the lower esophagus; due to portal hypertension in cirrhosis of the liver.
lymph varix (varix lympha´ticus) a soft, lobulated swelling of a lymph node due to obstruction of lymphatic vessels.

var·ix

, pl.

va·ri·ces

(var'iks, var'i-sēz),
1. A dilated vein.
2. An enlarged and tortuous vein, artery, or lymphatic vessel.
[L. varix (varic-), a dilated vein]

varix

/va·rix/ (var´iks) pl. va´rices   [L.] an enlarged tortuous vein, artery, or lymphatic vessel.
aneurysmal varix  a markedly dilated tortuous vessel.
arterial varix  a racemose aneurysm or varicose artery.
esophageal varices  varicosities of branches of the azygos vein which anastomose with tributaries of the portal vein in the lower esophagus, due to portal hypertension in cirrhosis.
lymph varix , varix lympha´ticus a soft, lobulated swelling of a lymph node, due to obstruction of lymphatic vessels.

varix

(văr′ĭks)
n. pl. var·ices (-ĭ-sēz′)
An abnormally dilated or swollen vein, artery, or lymph vessel.

varix

[ver′iks] pl. varices
Etymology: L, varicose vein
a tortuous, dilated vein, artery, or lymphatic vessel.
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Varix

varix

Surgery An enlarged and convoluted vein, artery or lymphatic vessel. See Varicose veins.

var·ix

, pl. varices (var'iks, -i-sēz)
1. A dilated vein.
2. An enlarged and tortuous vein, artery, or lymphatic vessel.
[L. varix (varic-), a dilated vein]

varix

(var'iks) (var'i-sez?) plural.varices [L., twisted or dilated vein]
1. A tortuous dilatation of a vein. See: varicose vein
2. Less commonly, dilatation of an artery or lymph vessel.

aneurysmal varix

A direct communication between an artery and a varicose vein without an intervening sac.

arterial varix

A varicosity or dilation of an artery.

chyle varix

A varix of a lymphatic vessel that conveys chyle.
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ESOPHAGEAL VARIX IN A PATIENT WITH CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER: Courtesy of John Roberts, MD

esophageal varix

A tortuous dilatation of an esophageal vein, esp. in the distal portion. It results from any condition that causes portal hypertension, typically cirrhosis of the liver. Müller's maneuver; illustration

Symptoms

If an esophageal varix bursts, massive hemorrhage occurs, and the patient may die within minutes.

Treatment

Medical treatment includes administration of a beta blocker, such as nadolol, with a nitrate, such as isosorbide, to lower portal pressures and decrease the likelihood of variceal bleeding. Invasive therapies include the injection of sclerosing agents or rubber banding of the dilated vein.

Patient care

Bleeding esophageal varices constitute a medical emergency, requiring immediate treatment to control hemorrhage and prevent hypovolemic shock. The patient’s vital signs, SaO2, ABGs, electrolyte and fluid volume balance, and level of consciousness are closely monitored. Intravenous access must be established promptly and fluid resuscitation, followed by transfusion and the administration of plasma are critical to early stabilization of the patient. Medical therapies also include the use of vasoconstricting drugs, such as vasopression. Endoscopy is used to identify the site of the ruptured vessels which may then be treated with sclerotherapy, ligation, or banding.

Surgical procedures to prevent rebleeding include portocaval or mesocaval shunts, portosystemic anastomosis, splenorenal shunting or liver transplantation. All procedures are explained, sensation messages provided, and reassurance and emotional support offered.

lymphaticus varix

Dilatation of a lymphatic vessel.

turbinal varix

Permanent dilatation of veins of turbinate bodies.

varix

See VARICES.

var·ix

, pl. varices (var'iks, -i-sēz)
1. A dilated vein.
2. An enlarged and tortuous vein, artery, or lymphatic vessel.
[L. varix (varic-), a dilated vein]

varix

pl. varices [L.] an enlarged, tortuous vein, artery or lymphatic vessel.

aneurysmal varix
a markedly dilated tortuous vessel; sometimes used to denote a form of arteriovenous aneurysm in which the blood flows directly into a neighboring vein without the intervention of a connecting sac.
arterial varix
a racemose aneurysm or varicose artery.
lymph varix, varix lymphaticus
a soft, lobulated swelling of a lymph node, due to obstruction of lymphatic vessels.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thrombosed right renal vein varix simulating a renal pelvic mass.
Zimmerman thus advanced the hypothesis that the development of the varix may be secondary to compression of vertebral veins by the adjacent disc, thereby leading to dilation and thrombosis.
6) On MRI, the varix appears as a dilated, serpiginous flow void in the epidural space.
We have presented a case of symptomatic epidural varix.
Extradural varix simulating herniated nucleus pulposus.
foliatum's growth are relevant to this introduction of varix function.
Palmer (1977) constructed his argument for varix function in C.
The second implication is that relative varix height affects the ability of the animal to right itself due to the change in the angles the animal experiences in relation to the substratum [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 2B, C OMITTED].
Palmer's (1977) interest was in the destabilizing effect of the middle varix during falls mainly in excess of 10 body lengths in height.
The patient was managed by endoscopic band ligation for oesophageal varix and injection sclerotherapy by 3% polidocanol for duodenal varix.
In the majority of cases, the etiology of duodenal varix is portal hypertension due to cirrhosis of the liver.
Other rarer causes of duodenal varix can be adhesions due to previous abdominal surgeries where collaterals, within the wall of the duodenum may open up.