vampirism


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A term that has been applied to a broad array of conditions and situations that the original authors of various reports linked to some aspect of mythical blood-sucking human vampires, or the fictional Count Dracula
Lab medicine Anaemia of investigation, iatrogenic anaemia, nosocomial anaemia, vampirism A fanciful and completely unnecessary synonym for hypochromic anaemia resulting from multiple phlebotomies, which is especially common in ITU/ICU patients
Anaemia of investigation can be reduced in frequency and severity by using paediatric—2.5–3.0 mL—instead of adult sized—4.5–10 mL—blood collection tubes
Medspeak A term coined in 1995 referring to the decrease of serum proteins—hypoalbuminemia and lipids-hypocholesterolemia—which was linked to sufferers’ frequent sale of plasma
Medical history Porphyria has been proposed as an explanation for the vampire legend, based on certain real or perceived similarities between the two. The similarities between porphyria and vampire syndrome include (1) photosensitivity/sensitivity to the sunlight, resulting in skin pallor in both; (2) congenital erythropoietic porphyria is characterised by very high levels of red-brown or burgundy-red porphyrin pigments with an affinity for calcium phosphate, resulting in incorporation into the teeth during odontogenesis. Permanent teeth range from pink to rare cases of red-brown or purple; (3) madness, sober moods and depression; (4) its occurrence in royals—e.g., Mary Queen of Scots, her father, James V—and, farther east and more linked to the legend, its occurrence in Vlad III the Impaler, aka Prince of Wallachia, aka Dracula; the alleged occurrence of porphyria in George III is far from proven. Systemic lupus has some vampire features, but is not traditionally linked to the vampire myth
Psychiatry Clinical vampirism A deviant behaviour in which blood is ingested, variably accompanied by necrophilia, often in a background of schizophrenia, psychosis, sadomasochism, cultism—e.g., voodoo rituals, cannibalism, fetishism or drug intoxication. See Necrophilia
Psychology Psychic vampire A morose person who, Dracula-like, sucks the life out of others because of his/her negative attitudes. They are gloomy, self-centred and can’t be helped
Sexual health A term of art referring to what some regard as a myth of male child sexual assault, i.e, that boys who are sexually abused, like the victims of Count Dracula, will go on to bite—i.e., sexually abuse—others

vampirism

The practice of drinking blood Clinical medicine A quasi-facetious term for excessive blood tests, which causes iatrogenic anemia. See Anemia of investigation Psychiatry A deviant behavior in which blood is ingested, variably accompanied by necrophilia, often in a background of schizophrenia, psychosis, sadomasochism, cult–eg, voodoo rituals, cannibalism, fetishism or drug intoxication. See Necrophilia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vampirism and suburbanism are ostensibly incompatible but actually symbiotic.
Topic by topic, the book tackles subjects such as Witchcraft, Vampirism, Satanic Possession, Reincarnation, and much more in this eye opening look at what most deem as simply fodder for science fiction and fantasy.
One of the best poems in the collection is undoubtedly "Vampires" (123) which deals with an incidence of vampirism in Malawi and how the government supposedly (albeit in an absurd manner) responds to the crisis.
These fantasies of nymphomania, vampirism, and male engulfment," Garraway points out, "were complemented by the trope of autoeroticism in the mulata [sic] Venus, whose cultivation of pleasure occurred not only at the expense of but in spite of her lover" (231).
aristocratic vampirism in the dark and remote Carpathian Mountains of
It turns out that the historical inspiration for the great novel's vampirism may have been the hematological disorder of congenital erythropoietic porphyria.
She uses vampirism as a metaphor to highlight how drugs and street violence are eating away at the fabric of society.
Money, as the novel suggests, should be used and circulated and vampirism somehow interferes with the natural ebb and flow of currency just as it literally intervenes in the ebbing and flowing of blood" (102).
The Occult-obsessed teenager drank blood, dabbled with vampirism and even kept a secret diary of all of her sexual exploits which she hid outdoors to keep it from her devout Catholic parents, pals have revealed.
One common sign of such possible activity in your backyard is the presence of the "Goth" movement, which author Dawn Perlmutter says draws the interest of youth to vampirism.
Unable to represent the world within the bounds of natural feeling and experience, a nightmare of paranoia, schizophrenia, necrophilism, and vampirism supervenes, in which the natural affections are perverted by the will to destroy.
An entire language of vampirism emerged, growing out of an earlier set of beliefs and practices concerning witchcraft.