vampire bat


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Related to vampire bat: Common Vampire Bat

vam·pire bat

a member of the genus Desmodus; an important reservoir host of rabies virus in Central and South America.

vampire bat

n.
1. Any of several bats of the subfamily Desmodontinae, found in subtropical and tropical regions of the Americas, that bite mammals and birds to feed on their blood and that often carry diseases such as rabies.
2. Any of various other bats, as those of the family Megadermatidae, erroneously believed to feed on blood.

vampire bat

vector for rabies in animals, humans. See desmodus rotundus murinus.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the same way, vampire bats are also constantly evolving their venom so as to protect the immune system from generating antibodies against the venom.
Our study revealed that at least 4 phylogenetic lineages of RABV are circulating in vampire bat populations in Peru; these lineages appeared to display distinctive spatiotemporal dynamics across their geographic ranges.
Rabies is an increasing economic issue throughout Central and South America due to the impact of virus transmission from vampire bats to cattle and other livestock.
Although vampires in movies and books suck blood from their victims, vampire bats do not.
At this time, viral activity is related to rabies transmitted by more common vampire bat, Desmodus rotundus.
The only way a reduction in fruit-eating bats, caused by lack of vegetation, could impact vampire bat numbers would be if this freed up potential roosting cavities for vampire bats.
An old experiment caged a vampire bat with a rat snake, Carter says.
She was chased by an angry silverback gorilla and bitten by a vampire bat.
I find it extraordinary that one day I can be holding the skull of a Venezuelan vampire bat in my hand and the next touching a meteorite that is 4.
3%) species was the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus); the other 14 species accounted for 0.
The bat could even become a lifesaver, as scientists hope to treat human heart patients with anticoagulant from the saliva of the Mexican vampire bat.
There is of course a species known as the vampire bat.