validity


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Related to validity: Content validity

validity

 [vah-lid´ĭ-te]
the extent to which a measuring device measures what it intends or purports to measure.
construct validity the degree to which an instrument measures the characteristic being investigated; the extent to which the conceptual definitions match the operational definitions.
content validity verification that the method of measurement actually measures what it is expected to measure; see also face validity.
external validity the extent to which study findings can be generalized beyond the sample used in the study.
face validity a type of content validity, determining the suitability of a given instrument as a source of data on the subject under investigation, using common-sense criteria.
internal validity the extent to which the effects detected in a study are truly caused by the treatment or exposure in the study sample, rather than being due to other biasing effects of extraneous variables.
predictive validity the effectiveness of one set of test or research results as a predictor of the outcome of future experiments or tests.

va·lid·i·ty

(vă-lid'i-tē),
An index of how well a test or procedure in fact measures what it purports to measure; an objective index by which to describe how valid a test or procedure is.

validity

[valid′itē]
(in research) the extent to which a test measurement or other device measures what it is intended to measure. A data collection tool should accurately reflect the concept that it is intended to measure. Kinds of validity include construct validity, content validity, current validity, and predictive validity. Compare reliability.

methodological quality

The extent to which the design and conduct of a trial are likely to have prevented systematic errors (bias). Variation in quality can explain variation on the results of trials included in a systematic review. Rigourously designed (better quality) trials are more likely to yield results that are closer to the “truth” (i.e., unbiased).

va·lid·i·ty

(vă-lid'i-tē)
Truthfulness; the ability of a test to measure correctly as intended.

validity 

The extent to which a measurement correctly measures what it is supposed to measure or to which extent the findings of an investigation reflect the truth. In health sciences, validity is commonly assessed by determining the sensitivity and specificity factors. See reliability; sensitivity; specificity.

va·lid·i·ty

(vă-lid'i-tē)
Index of how well a test or procedure in fact measures what it purports to measure; an objective index by which to describe how valid a test or procedure is.

validity,

n the degree to which data or results of a study are correct or true.
References in classic literature ?
A compact between independent sovereigns, founded on ordinary acts of legislative authority, can pretend to no higher validity than a league or treaty between the parties.
No doubt physiology, especially the disturbances of memory through lesions in the brain, affords grounds for this hypothesis; nevertheless it does remain a hypothesis, the validity of which will be discussed at the end of this lecture.
So what is the validity of the measuring instrument?
Under the proposed Interpretation, an enterprise must satisfy a stringent evidentiary burden in order to establish a probable level of confidence in the validity of its tax position.
She proposed that ecological validity was a more useful concept than culture itself.
The VFS131 extends the capabilities and advantages of our existing products by providing our customers with an excellent sensor choice where a reduced form factor is a requirement," said Jeff Andersen, VP of sales at Validity.
In fact, the scientific community has not encouraged its use due to a lack of supporting evidence for reliability and validity.
Yet, Scriven (1995) identified several construct validity problems with student ratings of instruction, one of them being student consumerism.
The following are two situations where Horizon was met with strong objections at the closing for being excessively cautious in questioning the validity of the power of attorney.
2004) admitted that women who plan their pregnancies may be systematically different from those who do not, that this may adversely affect external validity to a degree which cannot be empirically evaluated, and that the findings may not be generalizable to all women.
However, Erastus was also an opponent of Paracelsus, and in his essay Gunnoe assesses the historical validity of the attacks Erastus leveled at the unconventional physician.
The validity of the research isn't affected by whether the appearance of "rats" in this manner was deliberate or not, but the validity of statements made in presenting this research certainly is.