valid consent

valid consent

A term of art defined in the context of the UK’s Human Tissue Act 2004 for consent to remove, use or store tissue from a person, which has been given voluntarily by an appropriately informed person, who has the capacity to agree to the activity in question.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Obtaining valid consent is a fundamental part of good practice in healthcare, but it is also one of the most complex issues confronting professionals in the sector.
I don't think users have been given enough information about what Facebook plans to do with their information, and I don't think WhatsApp has got valid consent from users to share the information.
It added that the social media giant will face action if it uses such data without valid consent.
Club owner Geoff Brown said yesterday he has applied for a certificate of lawfulness to prove the pitch does have valid consent.
This is only a necessary condition because it is an analysis of consent rather than valid consent or morally transformative consent.
You have the right to accept or refuse treatment that is offered to you and not to be given any physical examination or treatment unless you have given valid consent.
Forced marriage is marriage without valid consent of one or both parties where duress is a factor.
Forced marriage is a marriage without valid consent of one or both parties, under pressure - this can include emotional pressure as well as assault or abduction.
To be able to give valid consent a person must be deemed competent.
Therefore, an assessment of capacity is an important part of obtaining a valid consent for ECT and any form of coercion would be unethical and unacceptable.
Research co-author and Director of Medical Education Research at Cardiff University, Dr Lynn Monrouxe, said: "During our research, common professionalism lapses reported by medical, dental, nursing, physiotherapy and pharmacy students included clinicians' and students' poor hygiene practices; talking to or about patients inappropriately; confidentiality breaches; students practising on patients without valid consent and going beyond the limits of their own competence.
a child under 12 years of age cannot give valid consent to suffer any harm which can occur from an act done in good faith and for its benefit, e.