vagrant

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vagrant

(vā′grănt) [L. vagrans]
1. Wandering from place to place without a fixed home.
2. A homeless person who wanders from place to place.
References in periodicals archive ?
Part II traces the evolution of vagrancy laws from the late-mediaeval period to the 19th century in what became Great Britain, highlighting how the perception of vagrants as proto-criminals shaped the terms of these statutes and their enforcement.
In 1972, the Supreme Court used the void-for-vagueness doctrine to strike down an archaic Florida vagrancy law in Papachristou v.
In the first four chapters, she mobilizes recent historical work on early modern vagrancy and wage labor in order to offer a theory of low subjectivity.
Their weapon of choice was vagrancy law, the same statutes under which women could be prosecuted for prostitution.
The above-referenced 1572 statute written largely by William Cecil, Lord Burghley, consolidated and emphasized a theme expressed in earlier laws: the connection between vagrancy and performance as "deceitful representation" (49).
JIMMY CANNON'S classic job description of a fight manager: "A guy with a license to steal while committing vagrancy.
Finally, our review section includes twenty-one reviews of books on varied topics such as witchcraft, vagrancy, and public devotion in early modern England, as well as on editions of the collected works of Elizabeth I and of writings by other early modern women.
In the Introduction, Benis qualifies this notion by offering "a cultural history of vagrancy in the Georgian period as refracted through the early poetry of William Wordsworth .
To engage in a labor contract implies complete freedom of choice, but, as Stanley argues, the realities of late-nineteenth-century American life, such as vagrancy laws, greatly detracted from the true equivalent of contract to freedom.
Hartman adds to this bleak picture of the Reconstruction era by detailing the replacement of the whip with the other forms of racial subjugation, such as lynching, indebted servitude, Black Codes, the contract system, vagrancy statutes, and anti-enticement laws.
The well-known "broken windows" theory postulates that "quality of life" elements of neighborhood decay, including graffiti, vagrancy, and open prostitution, lead to more serious crimes.
New immigrants were caught up in these conflicts, first, because as strangers, their norms and values were sometimes contrary with those of the established or traditional immigrants, and second because they arrived during a period in which the host society was in the grip of a series of moral reforms and conflicts aimed, at least in part, at them, reforms designed to enforce sobriety and family support, and to suppress prostitution, gambling, and vagrancy.