vagolytic


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Related to vagolytic: vagus nerve, vagolysis

vagolytic

 [va″go-lit´ik]
1. pertaining to or caused by vagolysis.
2. having an effect like that produced by interruption of impulses transmitted by the vagus nerve; see also parasympatholytic.

va·go·lyt·ic

(vā'gō-lit'ik),
1. Pertaining to or causing vagolysis.
2. A therapeutic or chemical agent that has inhibitory effects on the vagus nerve.
3. Denoting an agent having such effects.

vagolytic

/va·go·lyt·ic/ (va″go-lit´ik)
1. pertaining to or caused by vagolysis.
2. having an effect resembling that produced by interruption of impulses transmitted by the vagus nerve.

va·go·lyt·ic

(vā'gō-lit'ik)
1. Pertaining to or causing vagolysis.
2. A therapeutic or chemical agent that has inhibitory effects on the vagus nerve.
3. Denoting an agent having such effects.

va·go·lyt·ic

(vā'gō-lit'ik)
1. Pertaining to or causing vagolysis.
2. A therapeutic or chemical agent that has inhibitory effects on the vagus nerve.
3. Denoting an agent having such effects.

vagolytic

having an effect resembling that produced by interruption of impulses transmitted by the vagus nerve; parasympatholytic.

vagolytic agents
includes atropine sulfate, glycopyrrolate, propantheline, isopropamide.
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References in periodicals archive ?
channels, it is weakly vagolytic and has [alpha]-adrenergic blocking properties.
This is consistent with the study of Neeti M and colleagues, (8) who attributed it to the weak vagolytic property of rocuronium.
Four patients in mephentermine group had one or more readings of heart rate below 60 beats/minute, but none of these patients required treatment with vagolytic agents.
Because the administration of remifentanil and succinycholine following the injection of propofol often decreases HR, a vagolytic agent should be considered for the prevention of severe bradycardia.
Presenters at the 1974 European Congress of Anaesthesiology were concerned about the vagolytic properties of pancuronium and, as a result, Dr Savage organized the 1st International Muscle Relaxant Symposium which was held at Westminster Hospital in London in 1975.
We did not use pancuronium which would be expected to result in tachycardia and possibly an increase in blood pressure from their vagolytic actions.
19] Usually, these temporary effects are predictable and can be successfully treated with vagolytics, vasopressors and volume infusions.