vacuum aspiration


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Related to vacuum aspiration: dilation and evacuation

aspiration

 [as″pĭ-ra´shun]
inhalation of some foreign material; aspiration of vomitus, blood, or mucus may occur when a person is unconscious or under the effects of a general anesthetic, and can be avoided by keeping the head turned to the side and removing all such foreign material from the air passages.
A, Types of aspiration. A, Aspiration before swallow caused by reduced tongue control. B, Aspiration before swallow caused by absent swallow response. C, Aspiration during swallow caused by reduced laryngeal closure. D Aspiration after swallow caused by pooled material in pyriform sinuses overflowing into airway. From Logemann J: Evaluation and Treatment of Swallowing Disorders, San Diego, College-Hill Press, 1983.
withdrawal of fluid by an aspirator; the method is widely used in hospitals, especially during surgery, to drain the area of the body being operated on and keep it clear of excess blood and other fluids to facilitate visualization of the surgical field. Sometimes after extensive surgery, suction drainage under the skin is used to speed the healing process.
meconium aspiration inhalation of meconium by the fetus or newborn, which may result in atelectasis, emphysema, pneumothorax, or pneumonia.
risk for aspiration a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual is at risk for entry of gastric secretions, oropharyngeal secretions, solids, or fluids into the tracheobronchial passage.
vacuum aspiration a form of induced abortion in which the uterine contents are removed by application of a vacuum through a hollow curet or a cannula introduced into the uterus.

vacuum aspiration

n.
A method of abortion performed during the first trimester of pregnancy in which the contents of the uterus are withdrawn through a narrow tube. Also called suction curettage, vacuum curettage.

vacuum aspiration

[vak′yo̅o̅·əm]
Etymology: L, vacuus, empty, aspirare, to breathe upon
a method of removing tissues from the uterus by suction for diagnostic purposes or to remove elements of conception. With the patient under local or light general anesthesia, the cervix is dilated, and the uterus is emptied with suction. Postoperative care includes the close observation of vital signs for symptoms of blood loss. Also called suction curettage. Compare dilation and curettage. See also elective abortion, therapeutic abortion.

vacuum aspiration

Evacuation of the contents of the uterus by a curet or catheter attached to a suction apparatus. The procedure is performed before the 12th week of gestation. It is the most common form of surgical abortion. Synonym: suction aspiration
See also: aspiration
References in periodicals archive ?
Manual vacuum aspiration and medical termination of pregnancy with Misoprostol have been introduced to replace this method.
Uterine evacuation: Use of vacuum aspiration or medications, not sharp curettage.
Eighty-five percent of women who had had a vacuum aspiration chose a short-acting method instead of no method, compared with only 43% of women who had had a medication abortion and 36% of those who had had a D&C (Table 2).
A concerted effort must be made to ensure that advanced midwives and doctors are skilled in vacuum deliveries, manual removal of the placenta and manual vacuum aspiration of the uterus for incomplete miscarriage.
Vacuum aspiration involves the evacuation of the contents of the uterus through a plastic or metal cannula, attached to a vacuum source.
On average, the cervical diameter prior to surgery was significantly greater in women who received misoprostol compared with placebo, and the mean duration of vacuum aspiration was significantly shorter in the misoprostol group vs.
A Cochrane review of 5 studies comparing expectant management with vacuum aspiration found expectant management carried a higher risk of incomplete miscarriage, need for vacuum aspiration, and bleeding.
We have not been able to find any animal studies of vacuum aspiration abortion published in the peer-reviewed medical literature.
In a study of women who had obtained an abortion at a clinic, only 38% reported that their procedure had involved vacuum aspiration, a safe and established method of early abortion, or dilation and curettage, an effective but somewhat less safe method (Figure 2).
She had experienced 2 episodes of spontaneous abortion, one 4 years earlier and the other the previous year; retained products had been removed by vacuum aspiration and dilation and curettage.
These are the key findings of a secondary analysis of data from a multicenter study comparing the effectiveness and safety of misoprostol and vacuum aspiration for the treatment of early pregnancy failure.