uterine fibroma

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Related to uterine fibroma: Fibroids, Uterine fibroids, Uterine sarcoma

uterine fibroma

a benign encapsulated uterine tumor. It affects about 20% of women over the age of 30. The tumor may develop in the wall of the uterus or be attached to a stalk of tissue originating in the wall. Symptoms may include menstrual disorders such as menorrhagia. Symptoms are also likely to be related to the location of the tumor with respect to neighboring organs, as when a uterine fibroma causes pressure on the urinary bladder, producing symptoms of dysuria. Uterine fibromas rarely spread or become life-threatening.


(fi-bro'ma) ('ma-ta) plural.fibromata [ fibro- + -oma]
A fibrous, encapsulated connective tissue tumor. It is irregular in shape, slow in growth, and has a firm consistency. Pressure or cystic degeneration may cause pain. It may affect the periosteum, jaws, occiput, pelvis, vertebrae, ribs, long bones, or sternum. fibromatous (-ma-tus), adjective

fibroma of breast

A benign, nonulcerative, painless breast tumor.

interstitial fibroma

A tumor in the muscular wall of the uterus that may grow inward and form a polypoid fibroid, or outward and become a subperitoneal fibroid. See: uterine leiomyoma

intramural fibroma

A tumor in the muscle tissue of the uterus between the peritoneal coat and endometrium.

submucous fibroma

A fibroma encroaching on the endometrial cavity. It may be sessile or pedunculated.

subserous fibroma

A fibroma, often pedunculated, lying beneath the peritoneal coat of the uterus.

uterine fibroma

Uterine leiomyoma.

Patient discussion about uterine fibroma

Q. uterine fibroids. Whats the best way to deal with them? My doctor says hysterectomy? What about my hormones?

A. Yes, drugs that suppress the levels of the female sex hormones (estrogen) are successful for treating uterine fibroids. However, the relief is only temporary and the fibroids recur once the treatment is stopped. In addition, these treatments cause side effects similar to menopause.

Surgery is the definitive treatment, especially for complications such as bleeding or pain, and when there's a suspicion for malignancy.

You may read more here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000914.htm

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