urticaria pigmentosa


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Related to urticaria pigmentosa: Systemic mastocytosis

urticaria

 [ur″tĭ-ka´re-ah]
a vascular reaction of the skin marked by transient appearance of slightly elevated patches (wheals) that are redder or paler than the surrounding skin and often attended by severe itching; the cause may be certain foods, infection, or emotional stress. (See Atlas 2, Plate D.) Called also hives. adj., adj urtica´rial.
cold urticaria urticaria precipitated by cold air, water, or objects, occurring in two forms: In the autosomal dominant form, which is associated with fever, arthralgias, and leukocytosis, the lesions occur as erythematous, burning papules and macules. The more common acquired form is usually idiopathic and self-limited.
giant urticaria angioedema.
urticaria hemorrha´gica purpura with urticaria.
urticaria medicamento´sa that due to use of a drug.
papular urticaria (urticaria papulo´sa) an allergic reaction to the bite of various insects, with appearance of lesions that evolve into inflammatory, increasingly hard, red or brownish, persistent papules.
urticaria pigmento´sa the most common form of mastocytosis, occurring primarily in children, manifested as persistent pink to brown macules or soft plaques of various size; pruritus and urtication occur on stroking the lesions.
urticaria pigmentosa, juvenile urticaria pigmentosa present at birth or in the first few weeks of life, usually disappearing before puberty, taking the form of a single nodule or tumor or of a disseminated eruption of yellowish brown to yellowish red macules, plaques, or bullae.
solar urticaria a rare form produced by exposure to sunlight.

ur·ti·car·i·a pig·men·to·'sa

cutaneous mastocytosis resulting from an excess of mast cells in the superficial dermis, producing a chronic eruption characterized by flat or slightly elevated brownish papules that urticate when stroked. The disease in children frequently involutes spontaneously whereas resolution is rare with adult onset and there may be systemic lesions.
See also: diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis.

urticaria pigmentosa

an uncommon form of mastocytosis characterized by pigmented skin lesions that usually begin in infancy and become urticarial on mechanical or chemical irritation. Although duration of the condition is unpredictable, prognosis is good. Treatment is symptomatic and usually includes antihistamines for relief of itching. See also mastocytosis.
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Urticaria pigmentosa

urticaria pigmentosa

An idiopathic self-limiting condition characterised by light brown welts, intense itching and hives. By age 2, affected children develop mast cell-rich lesions which produce histamine and cause the typical skin response; rubbed lesions rapidly develop a wheal and systemic symptoms (flushing, headache, diarrhoea, tachycardia, and fainting); younger children may develop fluid-filled blisters over a traumatised lesion. It often disappears by puberty.

urticaria pigmentosa

Dermatology An idiopathic self-limiting benign condition characterized by light brown skin lesions, intense itching, and hives at the site of rubbed lesions; affected children develop by age 2 lesions containing mast cells which produce histamine and cause the typical skin response–rubbed lesions rapidly develop a wheal and systemic Sx–flushing, headache, diarrhea, tachycardia, fainting; younger children may develop a fluid-filled blister over a traumatized lesion; UP often disappears by puberty. See Histamine, Mastocytosis.

ur·ti·ca·ria pig·men·to·sa

(ŭr'ti-kar'ē-ă pig'men-tō'să)
Cutaneous mastocytosis resulting from an excess of mast cells in the superficial dermis, producing a chronic eruption characterized by flat or slightly elevated brownish papules that urticate when stroked.

Nettleship,

Edward, English ophthalmologist and dermatologist, 1845-1913.
Nettleship dilator
Nettleship iris repositor
Nettleship syndrome - pigmented nodules or macules. Synonym(s): urticaria pigmentosa

urticaria

a vascular reaction of the skin that is commonly immunologically based or may be due to direct exposure to a chemical. Marked by transient appearance of slightly elevated patches (wheals) which are redder or paler than the surrounding skin and often attended by severe itching; called also hives. The wheals may be in very large numbers, mostly over the body, 0.5 to 2 inches in diameter and there is no discontinuity of the epithelium. Called also nettle rash.

giant urticaria, urticaria gigantea
angioneurotic edema.
heat reflex urticaria
see cholinergic pruritus.
urticaria hemorrhagica
purpura with urticaria.
urticaria medicamentosa
that due to use of a drug.
nasolacrimal urticaria
conjunctivitis and rhinitis caused by hypersensitivity to inhaled allergens (atopy).
papular urticaria, urticaria papulosa
an allergic reaction to the bite of various insects, with appearance of lesions that evolve into inflammatory, increasingly hard, red or brownish, persistent papules. See also lichen.
urticaria pigmentosa
a proliferative disorder of mast cells in humans; a similar disease has been reported in young cats. There is erythema and hyperpigmentation of the mouth, chin, neck and eyes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Others have reported unremarkable administration of general and regional anaesthetics in patients with systemic mastocytosis (20-26), urticaria pigmentosa (27-30) and solitary cutaneous mastocytosis (29).
Evolution of urticaria pigmentosa into indolent systemic mastocytosis: abnormal immunophenotype of mast cells without evidence of c-kit mutation ASP-816-VAL.
2B), consistent with cutaneous mastocytosis in the form of urticaria pigmentosa.