unsaturated

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unsaturated

 [un-sach´er-āt″ed]
1. not having all affinities of its elements satisfied (unsaturated compound).
2. not holding all of a solute that can be held in solution by the solvent (unsaturated solution).
3. denoting compounds in which two or more atoms are united by double or triple bonds.

un·sat·ur·at·ed

(ŭn-sach'ŭr-āt'ĕd),
1. Not saturated; denoting a solution in which the solvent is capable of dissolving more of the solute.
2. Denoting a chemical compound in which all the affinities are not satisfied, so that still other atoms or radicals may be added to it.
3. In organic chemistry, denoting compounds containing double and/or triple bonds or a ring structure.

unsaturated

/un·sat·u·rat·ed/ (un-sach´ur-āt″ed)
1. not holding all of a solute which can be held in solution by the solvent.
2. denoting compounds in which two or more atoms are united by double or triple bonds.
Enlarge picture
Unsaturated (A) and saturated (B) two-carbon hydrocarbons.

unsaturated

(ŭn-săch′ə-rā′tĭd)
adj.
1. Of or relating to an organic compound, especially a fatty acid, containing one or more double or triple bonds between the carbon atoms.
2. Capable of dissolving more of a solute at a given temperature.

un′sat·u·ra′tion n.

unsaturated

[unsach′ərātid]
Etymology: ME, un + L, saturare, to fill
1 adj, describing a solution that is capable of dissolving more of the solute; not saturated.
2 n, an organic compound in which one or more pairs of carbon atoms are united by double or triple bonds, as in unsaturated fatty acids. Also called unsaturated hydrocarbon. Compare saturated.

un·sat·ur·at·ed

(ŭn-sach'ŭr-āt-ĕd)
1. Not saturated; denoting a solution in which the solvent is capable of dissolving more of the solute.
2. Denoting a chemical compound in which all the affinities are not satisfied, so that still other atoms or radicals may be added to it.
3. organic chemistry Denoting compounds containing double and/or triple bonds.

unsaturated

Pertaining to a compound, especially of carbon, in which atoms are linked by double or triple valence bonds. A saturated compound has only single bonds. In general, unsaturated compounds are less stable than saturated compounds and can undergo a wider variety of reactions.

unsaturated

1. not having all affinities of its elements satisfied (unsaturated compound).
2. not holding all of a solute which can be held in solution by the solvent (unsaturated solution).
3. denoting compounds in which two or more atoms are united by double or triple bonds.

unsaturated fatty acids
see fatty acids.
References in periodicals archive ?
The higher the unsaturation level of the polymer, the steeper the decrease in EB (figure 8b).
Low unsaturation levels are beneficial for heat aging of EPDM, which is usually explained in terms of a decreased susceptibility for continued crosslinking, initiated by the radicals formed during the thermo-oxidative reaction cycle.
In the first step, peroxide mediated grafting of VTMS is carried out, resulting in some VTMS grafting but also in formation of some terminal unsaturation due to chain scission.
However, the first step is important to create unsaturation in the polymer that can be utilized in the silane grafting step of the process.
the pendant unsaturation of a third monomer acts as an intrinsically linked co-agent to the polymer chain, and thereby competes with it for reaction with EPDM macro-radicals.
In an effort to increase the VNB content in EPDM and in order to overcome practical problems, such as excessive reactor fouling resulting from branching reactions involving the pendant vinyl unsaturation, a wide variety of advanced catalyst systems for the polymerization of EPDM has been evaluated at DSM.
The more clear changes with respect to the triglyceride are the disappearance of the peaks corresponding to protons in the unsaturations and the appearance of rather broad peak at 4.
The analysis showed the disappearance of the unsaturations in the triglyceride and the increase of the OH concentration in the modified polyol as compared to the initial oil.
Indeed, iodine is often used to titrate PE unsaturations (26, 27),
This polymer obtained by the Philips process possesses more unsaturations than a polymer obtained from the Ziegler process (Table 1) (28).
Moreover, in add ition to catalyst residues, the increased concentration of unsaturations may influence stability [6, 8, 22].