unnatural

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unnatural

(ŭn-năch′ər-əl)
adj.
1.
a. Not in accordance with what usually occurs in nature: a tree with an unnatural shape.
b. Not included in nature; artificial: detergents and other unnatural chemicals.
2.
a. Deviating from a behavioral or social norm: a child's unnatural attachment to a doll.
b. Brutal or unfeeling: unnatural cruelty.
3. Stilted, affected, or awkward: an unnatural smile.

un·nat′u·ral·ly adv.
un·nat′u·ral·ness n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Seen in the context of natural harmony, the prison emerges as the core of societal and institutionalized unnaturalness.
Siipi studies the concept of unnaturalness in its various forms and shows that while indeed neuroenhancements can be described as unnatural in many senses of the word, it does not follow that therefore there is something morally wrong with them.
Work is the activity which corresponds to the unnaturalness of human existence, which is not imbedded in, and whose mortality is not compensated by, the species' ever-recurring life cycle.
Participant 3, a 55-year-old female, highlighted the unnaturalness of the struggle.
Or, perhaps this would say that the Internet hasn't created new connections, but has shown the unnaturalness of our old idea that the world consists primarily of isolated objects; the boundaries were smudged all along, but we just couldn't admit it.
The unnaturalness of "absence of subject-verb agreement" follows from scale 1.
277) point out, learners are well aware that they are in a learning situation and will be prepared to tolerate the level of unnaturalness or unauthenticity required in the interests of efficiency.
Thus, traditionalist assertions about the unnaturalness of certain sexual actions are flawed.
How the journal and its authors understood the connection between literature and life is apparent in the article "The Unnaturalness of a nation" by Milan Kundera.
Hesiod seems determined not to detract in any way from her unnaturalness or artifice.
It is therefore possible that this feature was borrowed from Yoruba by the CS grammar in order to break the resultant unnaturalness (stiffness) that may occur at switch junctions between English and Yoruba.
Whereas both the English and Scandinavian undead offended by the stench and appearance of their decomposing bodies, the later undead manifest their unnaturalness by their apparent lack of decomposition.